Shop More Submit  Join Login
About Deviant Administrator Art is long, life is short, judgement difficult, opportunity transient. --Johann Wolfgang von GoetheMale/United States Groups :icondepthradius: depthRADIUS
We are listening to each other.
Recent Activity
Deviant for 8 Years
Premium Member 'til Hell freezes over
Statistics 322 Deviations 4,296 Comments 578,418 Pageviews

FOX09

Introducing depthRADIUS

Logo design by Mario Luevanos
Film and animation by Scott Pagan


About depthRADIUS


depthRADIUS is named after the deviantART community that it reflects and represents. Built in service of the largest and most influential community of culture creators and culture responders in the world, this on-line journal explores the depths of the arts world from fine art to the most eminently accessible community arts projects. depthRADIUS endeavors to connect artists and art enthusiasts with other artists and art appreciators from all levels of the arts community, from its most successful stars and innovators to beginners just learning their crafts. The “radius” of this journalistic conversation will extend in its boundaries into arts advocacy, cultural relevancy, education and appreciation.

A Few Recent Journals



“We are all listening to each other.”

:icondepthradius:



You owe reality nothing and the truth about your feelings everything. — Richard Hugo 

82%
838 deviants said True - Please advise.
18%
186 deviants said False - Please advise.

Epiousios

Art

the artist acts like a mediumistic being who, from the labyrinth beyond time and space, seeks his way out to a clearing.

-Marcel Duchamp

Burns Brighter

I want a trouble-maker for a lover,
Blood spiller, blood drinker, a heart of flame,
Who quarrels with the sky and fights with fate,
Who burns like fire on the rushing sea.

From Rumi’s Kolliyaat-e Shams-e Tabrizi

True

Among those whom I like or admire, I can find no common denominator, but among those whom I love, I can: all of them make me laugh.
--W. H. Auden

Do You Realize? by The Flaming Lips -- Lyrics

Do You Realize - that you have the most beautiful face
Do You Realize - we're floating in space
Do You Realize - that happiness makes you cry
Do You Realize - that everyone you know someday will die

And instead of saying all of your goodbyes - let them know
You realize that life goes fast
It's hard to make the good things last
You realize the sun doesn't go down
It's just an illusion caused by the world spinning round

Do You Realize - that you have the most beautiful face

By The Way...

The best things in life are not things.

Shoutbox

Chocolatekitty27:iconchocolatekitty27:
Hi :3
Sat Oct 25, 2014, 2:23 PM
rogurto-draws-things:iconrogurto-draws-things:
I AM LIEK, YELLING RIGHT NOW
Sun Oct 19, 2014, 6:24 AM
Genesis-07:icongenesis-07:
Hi :3 donate me?
Tue Oct 14, 2014, 4:28 PM
Just-To-Look1:iconjust-to-look1:
Hi. SHOUT SHOUT SHOUT SHOUT :D
Sat Oct 11, 2014, 10:39 PM
ZigtheZag:iconzigthezag:
why am I shouting? why can't I whisper or say things in a normal voice?
Sat Oct 11, 2014, 7:34 PM
qeva
may we be friends? :3
Mon Aug 25, 2014, 12:40 AM
ColourlessGirl:iconcolourlessgirl:
i wish i knew more homestuck fans!
Sat Aug 23, 2014, 11:14 PM
WolfPawCreator:iconwolfpawcreator:
There will always be people who are willing to help you.
Fri Aug 22, 2014, 11:25 PM
Team-Butch:iconteam-butch:
The cat turns blue at midnight
Fri Aug 22, 2014, 7:27 PM
UzumakiNaomiOC:iconuzumakinaomioc:
Hi. How are u?
Fri Aug 22, 2014, 4:05 PM
Nobody

Watchers

Visitors

:iconfrankblack6:
FrankBlack6
Oct 25, 2014
3:05 pm
:iconmimishblah:
MimishBlah
Oct 25, 2014
3:02 pm
:iconwinter-leaves:
Winter-Leaves
Oct 25, 2014
3:00 pm
:iconmewzyx:
mewzyx
Oct 25, 2014
2:58 pm
:iconfenifire:
fenifire
Oct 25, 2014
2:57 pm

Activity


Billm by techgnotic











Sometimes a painter’s vision expresses and inspires what the zen philosopher’s words can only define and describe.





When remarkable lives defined by success and abundance are reviewed from their beginnings, it is remarkable that the narrowest of paths, sometimes a precarious balancing between life and death itself, led to the decision to fight on when failure seemed certain. So it was for our beloved friend Bill Murray, having once entertained the thought of ending it all before his career had a chance of getting started. Just imagine how much pure unadulterated joy the world would have been denied had Bill taken that one fatal misstep in his journey on a cold day at the water’s edge…


Nixon’s world imploded with his resignation as President of the United States in the summer of 1974 and a more hopeful America arose in its place. A part of this new world was a fresh anarchistic current of comedy that satirized all the stale conventions of the society that gave us Nixon, ‘Nam and “TV Dinners.” In ’75 a funny guy named John Belushi brought Bill Murray into the “National Lampoon Radio Hour” (a sort of post–grad project of “Harvard Lampoon” alumni). In ’77 Murray was drafted into the then–revolutionary Saturday Night Live during its second season to replace it’s first “star” departure, Chevy Chase. Hip America fell in love with Bill’s “unmade bed” everyman persona over the next three SNL seasons. Bill then transitioned well into the movies with Meatballs, Caddyshack and Stripes. In 1984 he agreed to step into a part vacated by the death of his friend, John Belushi, who was perhaps the single most significant champion and promoter of his early career. He took the part to help finance his remake of The Razor’s Edge, from the Maugham novel about a man’s search for spiritual meaning in a violent and randomly cruel world—issues obviously on Bill’s mind in the wake of John’s death. Ghostbusters went on to become one of the box office blockbusters of all time. Razor’s Edge is gone and all but forgotten.



Bill starred in audience favorite Goundhog Day, but most of his film work has tilted into more experimental and eccentric moviemaking, like Wes Anderson’s Royal Tenenbaums, Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, Fantastic Mr. Fox and “Moonrise Kingdom.” In 2003 he starred in what he has claimed is his favorite role, as the American movie star Lost in Translation in Japan, having flown in to pick up a big check for doing a TV commercial. The Sofia Coppola–directed film afforded Bill the space to examine a life of fame, opportunities, generous remuneration for one’s talents—and yet still nagged by the core loneliness afflicting all humans. That we’ll never know what it is (perhaps some zen wisdom from Razor’s Edge) that he whispers to fellow traveler and lost soul Scarlett Johansson is the moment that elevates this movie into humanist masterpiece, the small detail that defines our lives on Earth. Pure movie nirvana.


Bill may be our slacker Buddha who continues to define in his every brilliant comedic choice the finer ironic points of modern living, but there was a time when darkness nearly swallowed his developing mind after a comedy club audience gave a thumbs–down to his stage debut. Bill was the disgraced newbie with the Second City crew in Chicago and in fit of depression decided to drive to Lake Michigan. Lucky for us, he had to pass the Chicago Art Institute on his way to the murky shore. Lucky for us, he decided to stop and take a moment before entering oblivion to put some beauty in his head. Lucky for us, that Jules Breton painted The Song of the Lark in 1884. The painting is of a stoically beautiful peasant woman at dawn, readying herself for another day’s hard labor in the fields. Her eyes are raised heavenward, as she apparently hears a lark, a small bird living hidden on the ground, but a singer of beautiful songs when having raised itself up into full flight. Lucky for us, that this painting was there to save Bill Murray’s life and renew his spirits, as he recently revealed, obviously resonating with the comic capable of transcendent humor but who had, nonetheless, crashed and burned on his first attempted public “flight.” Lucky for us that an appreciation for art was a large enough part of his life to inspire him to soar again.










Song of the Lark
by Jules Breton










Your Thoughts






  1. Have you ever had the experience of being lifted out of a seriously dangerous depression or sadness by losing yourself in a work of art? Was the artwork on deviantART and would you share by posting it here in the Comments section?

  2. Is there a particular artist whose works you look at to be uplifted or that invariably just make you feel happy?









Collection: Haunted Houses

Fri Oct 24, 2014, 6:40 PM
The Haunted House by DAN-KA







Haunted Houses


Coming across a deserted house, whether hidden by the distance of a rolling countryside or by the shadows of adjoining city ghetto dwellings, is like stumbling across an unnoticed, unburied corpse. It is obviously dead now, but once it was full of lives. Coming across a haunted house is different. Deserted or still occupied, it is a place where lives, unsatisfied, have refused to move on into a full death. The houses reflect their tenants. They are living dead structures, refusing to return to dust.









Collection: Haunted Houses
Coming across a deserted house, whether hidden by the distance of a rolling countryside or by the shadows of adjoining city ghetto dwellings, is like stumbling across an unnoticed, unburied corpse. It is obviously dead now, but once it was full of lives. Coming across a haunted house is different. Deserted or still occupied, it is a place where lives, unsatisfied, have refused to move on into a full death. The houses reflect their tenants. They are living dead structures, refusing to return to dust.
Loading...
jason voorhees friday the 13th wallpaper by suspension99







Movie Poster




About



It's October and the sacred 31 days of Halloween are upon us-time to get your gore on! The chill is in the air, the leaves are on the ground, and Halloween candy has been out since Labor Day. So while you’re waiting in the Starbucks line for an overpriced double pumpkin spice whatever, pass the time with this year’s scary movies reviews!







Friday The 13th (1980)



Review by RWSlavin



The producers say they were just trying to copy the success of 1978’s “Halloween,” with its simple (and built for low-budget) formula of “isolate high school kids and let a maniac chop them up.” Cultural anthropologists will point out that maniacs Myers, Voorhees & Krueger materialized as the American zeitgeist was shifting from the liberal “60s” to the conservative Reagan backlash years. These “slasher” films were exploitative excuses to celebrate alcohol, dope, partying and bare breasts, yet at the same time they were condemning of such activities as deserving summary death sentences carried out by one of the three instantly iconic angels of death. American capitalist genius: condemn sinful activities, but make the condemnation itself maximally profitable.


The movie itself is a rollercoaster ride through the woods of newly reopened Camp Crystal Lake, scene of the unsolved murders of two fornicating camp counselors many years before. One by one the new crew of fornicating, dope-smoking summer camp counselors is killed off by a maniac seen only in quick flashes. That’s basically the whole story. But the Jason story has become such a classic fable by now that I’m probably not being a “spoiler” to reveal that the only twist is the original killer from F13(#1) is Jason’s mother, who gets beheaded by the sole survivor. Jason’s “shock ending” appearance, popping out of the lake to attack the survivor in her rowboat, was an after-thought not in the script.  Make-up man Tom Savini had just seen “Carrie” with its last second shocker in the denouement and so “homage” was paid. Jason himself would show up as the unkillable romper-stomper who returned again and again throughout the ‘80s, went to Hell in ’93 and into outer space in 2001. “Built in America” – nothing runs like our profitable cinematic maniacs.










Mini Horror Reviews - Friday The 13th (1980)
It's October and the sacred 31 days of Halloween are upon us-time to get your gore on! The chill is in the air, the leaves are on the ground, and Halloween candy has been out since Labor Day. So while you’re waiting in the Starbucks line for an overpriced double pumpkin spice whatever, pass the time with this year’s scary movies reviews!
Loading...

Mini Horror Reviews - Psycho (1960)

Thu Oct 23, 2014, 6:03 PM
Hitchcock by jdelgado







Movie Poster





About


It's October and the sacred 31 days of Halloween are upon us-time to get your gore on! The chill is in the air, the leaves are on the ground, and Halloween candy has been out since Labor Day. So while you’re waiting in the Starbucks line for an overpriced double pumpkin spice whatever, pass the time with this year’s scary movies reviews!







Psycho (1960)



Review by RWSlavin



The now legendary shower sequence in which Jamie Lee Curtis’s mom gets stabbed to death is still one of the scariest scenes ever, even though we now know it’s coming and get to brace ourselves. The rest of the movie is pure moment–to–moment heebie–jeebies with Tony Perkins at his creepiest and all along we know his mummified mother up in the attic is waiting to meet us. Knowing the story so well seems to have made the movie scarier over the years, rather than the passage of time having had its usual mitigating effect. Hitchcock had hit some snags in getting his next film produced and decided he was going to create a shocker for the ages with none of the moments of comic relief his other films were known for.  The shower scene was so brutal that he didn’t fight the studio on shooting it—and then the whole picture—in black–and–white. He feared that audiences would be so numbed by his new level of screen violence that their senses would shut down and they’d zone out for the rest of the movie. Psycho is relentless. Still a visceral experience 60 years later.










Mini Horror Reviews - Psycho (1960)
It's October and the sacred 31 days of Halloween are upon us-time to get your gore on! The chill is in the air, the leaves are on the ground, and Halloween candy has been out since Labor Day. So while you’re waiting in the Starbucks line for an overpriced double pumpkin spice whatever, pass the time with this year’s scary movies reviews!

Writers: RWSlavin

For more articles like this, please visit depthRADIUS
Loading...

Collection: Hands

Thu Oct 23, 2014, 6:01 PM
new born at home by bres6







Hands


A subject’s hands are the make–up artist’s nightmare. But a subject’s hands are the artist’s delight. All the lines, scars or arthritic bumps are a road map of our lives. The smooth or rough of the skin indicates a life of labor or leisure (or, at least, cerebral tasks). The gesticulations of the hands, captured by the alert and sensitive artist, can often articulate so much more than mere words.









Collection: Hands
A subject’s hands are the make–up artist’s nightmare. But a subject’s hands are the artist’s delight. All the lines and scars and arthritic bumps are a road map of our lives. The smooth or rough of the skin indicates a life of labor or leisure (or, at least, cerebral tasks). The gesticulations of the hands, captured by the alert and sensitive artist, can often articulate so much more than mere words.
Loading...










Every year, the United Nations sets a theme for their International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. The 2014 theme is…



Leave no one behind: think, decide and act together against extreme poverty.”






I n a world as progressed as we believe ourselves to be it seems that poverty is still winning and growing. Income disparity in “advanced” economies such as the United States is growing rapidly with the top 1% gaining and the middle class slipping precariously. The Pope and other world leaders have identified income disparity as the greatest danger facing the world. In the former Soviet-influenced states, oligarchs amass wealth putting every capitalist of the last two centuries to shame while the general population slides deeper into deprivation.


Africa, East Asia and many parts of Central and South America remain as poor as ever even as local economic opportunity grows. In North Korea the population is simply poor.  In China, people work themselves to death while their economy is touted as the next great consumer market. We can only guess at what it means to be in a factory city working in a factory, for factory wages, without any suggestion that you will ever evolve to any other place or level. Another kind of poverty?


Of late the press increasingly carries stories that the very wealthy are “pitching-in” to solve world hunger or eradicate malaria or fund micro-banking initiatives. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Clinton Initiative, Mark Zuckerberg from Facebook and his wife all announce in their names their latest “good intentions”. But the fact remains that this reinforces the notion that only the very wealthy can afford to care about the poor.



Governments and religious organizations provide massive funding for programs aimed at the poor all over the world. But even without statistical study we can tell its a thin layer of support.


Poverty breeds war. We spend more money on those. And then we spend on refugees. And then they join the ranks in deep poverty.








President Johnson in the United States announced a war on poverty only to see that dream abandoned for a war on Vietnam instead. This repeated over and over in every part of the world. Leaders and nations with great hopes and intentions towards the poor sidelined by war and greed.


Historically it has always been the working people, not the wealthy, who have proportionally donated massively more of their income to aid the impoverished at home and around the world either directly through charitable donations or through taxation. When workers’ income is falling backward, along with their lifestyles, how can they be expected to come to the aid of the impoverished? Survival is uppermost on the minds of most workers right now, not charity, let alone spending time strategizing for the great coming together of upper and middle classes for a joint effort to eradicate poverty forever.



So the question as to who will truly be “thinking and deciding how to act together” now to end extreme poverty will probably be the question on the lips of those who have read this far.



But how do you/we decide to act?



What in your daily life can contribute to aid the poor or pull down the forces that push people into poverty? How could the arts contribute beyond simply placing the reality of poverty in front of us all in pictures and in words? Could there be a universal symbol of relief, care and comfort without religious overtones to unify all world cultures? How can we teach compassion with our art?












Your Thoughts






  1. As an artist do you feel you have a special responsibility to use your creativity to invent art projects that bring awareness of injustice and suffering?

  2. Have you ever sent art to your government representatives as a way to initiate action by them?

  3. Have you found any art projects in your neighborhood or country which focus on poverty and on providing solutions to hunger, housing, and support for the disenfranchised?

  4. Do you feel in your heart of hearts that the haves and the have-nots will one day recognize each other as one family?









deviantID

techgnotic
Art is long, life is short, judgement difficult, opportunity transient. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
United States
Current Residence: A Peaceful State
deviantWEAR sizing preference: L
Print preference: As Big As Possible.
Favourite genre of music: Rock. Jazz(Hard Bop). Blues. 80's Metal. Tribal(Aboriginal thru Electronic). Classical.Troubado
Favourite photographer: Sebastio Salgado. Richard Mapplethorpe. Walker Evans. Weegee.
Favourite style of art: Post-impressionist. Abstract-expressionist. The New Digital Vanguard. Contemporary fantasy.
Operating System: OSX
MP3 player of choice: Shuffle
Shell of choice: Any Conch will do.
Wallpaper of choice: French Louis XIV Rococo Style
Skin of choice: Thick enough to persevere and thin enough to feel.
Interests

Journal History

Comments


Add a Comment:
 
:icontamasgaspar:
TamasGaspar Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2014  Professional
Though I don't know how I deserved it, but thank you very much for the premium membership Sir! :bow::bow::bow:
Reply
:iconfrancesca-carboni:
Francesca-Carboni Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
thanks so much for the fav <3 Meow-thank You 
Reply
:iconnfergason:
nfergason Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2014
Thanks for the Fave!
Reply
:iconrichard67915:
Richard67915 Featured By Owner Sep 28, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks for the fave!!
Reply
:iconaussiedidge:
AussieDidge Featured By Owner Sep 19, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for the favourite on my journal piece. I did really enjoy your tribute to Robin Williams, and it was a great showcase of art from the people involved.

He shall be remembered for many generations to come.

Take care! :)
Reply
:iconraynnergil:
raynnerGIL Featured By Owner Sep 12, 2014  Professional Interface Designer
thank you very much for premium member!!! :D any help, let me know
Reply
:iconscheinbar:
scheinbar Featured By Owner Sep 9, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
:sun: thanks so much :sun:
:sun::sun::sun::sun::sun:
Reply
:iconcali-purp:
Cali-Purp Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The best things in life are felt not touched.
Reply
:icondamaimikaz:
DamaiMikaz Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks for adding Public image to your collections. I'm happy that you like it :la:
Reply
:icontechgnotic:
techgnotic Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2014
You're welcome. Love reading through the conversation that you have ignited.
Reply
:iconbluesodamania:
BluesodaMania Featured By Owner Sep 1, 2014  Student Filmographer
Amazing tribute to Robin Williams. I'll miss him too.
Reply
:iconbmb2000ca:
bmb2000ca Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I love your Robert Williams tribute. It's a very nice obituary.
Reply
:iconlonesomemusicnote:
LonesomeMusicNote Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
I enjoy your tribute to Robin. I am very saddened by his passing. I even made a tribute to him myself. Thank you for respecting such a great man.
Reply
:icontraciewayling:
traciewayling Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
I did one for Robin, too.  Robin Williams inspired me in so many ways and on so many levels over the years. I was personally heartbroken when I heard the news of his death. He will be missed, and he will never be forgotten. If the one good thing to come from this is his ability to continue to highlight causes, all that it is to be human and all that needs to be understood, then maybe he has done all that he set out to do. RIP Robin, for whatever the reason it was your time, and maybe, just maybe a shed load more lives will have been saved as a result of this final twist of your own life story <3

traciewayling.deviantart.com/a…
Reply
Add a Comment: