Shop More Submit  Join Login
About Deviant Administrator Art is long, life is short, judgement difficult, opportunity transient. --Johann Wolfgang von GoetheMale/United States Groups :icondepthradius: depthRADIUS
We are listening to each other.
Recent Activity
Deviant for 8 Years
Premium Member 'til Hell freezes over
Statistics 387 Deviations 4,363 Comments 641,003 Pageviews

FOX09

Introducing depthRADIUS

Logo design by Mario Luevanos
Film and animation by Scott Pagan


About depthRADIUS


depthRADIUS is named after the deviantART community that it reflects and represents. Built in service of the largest and most influential community of culture creators and culture responders in the world, this on-line journal explores the depths of the arts world from fine art to the most eminently accessible community arts projects. depthRADIUS endeavors to connect artists and art enthusiasts with other artists and art appreciators from all levels of the arts community, from its most successful stars and innovators to beginners just learning their crafts. The “radius” of this journalistic conversation will extend in its boundaries into arts advocacy, cultural relevancy, education and appreciation.

A Few Recent Journals



“We are all listening to each other.”

:icondepthradius:



You owe reality nothing and the truth about your feelings everything. — Richard Hugo 

82%
869 deviants said True - Please advise.
18%
195 deviants said False - Please advise.

Epiousios

Art

the artist acts like a mediumistic being who, from the labyrinth beyond time and space, seeks his way out to a clearing.

-Marcel Duchamp

Burns Brighter

I want a trouble-maker for a lover,
Blood spiller, blood drinker, a heart of flame,
Who quarrels with the sky and fights with fate,
Who burns like fire on the rushing sea.

From Rumi’s Kolliyaat-e Shams-e Tabrizi

True

Among those whom I like or admire, I can find no common denominator, but among those whom I love, I can: all of them make me laugh.
--W. H. Auden

Do You Realize? by The Flaming Lips -- Lyrics

Do You Realize - that you have the most beautiful face
Do You Realize - we're floating in space
Do You Realize - that happiness makes you cry
Do You Realize - that everyone you know someday will die

And instead of saying all of your goodbyes - let them know
You realize that life goes fast
It's hard to make the good things last
You realize the sun doesn't go down
It's just an illusion caused by the world spinning round

Do You Realize - that you have the most beautiful face

By The Way...

The best things in life are not things.

Shoutbox

love2photos:iconlove2photos:
Hi everyone check out my profile!
Thu Nov 27, 2014, 4:34 AM
ghostgirl77727:iconghostgirl77727:
Shoutout to you sir
Sat Nov 15, 2014, 8:09 PM
RhynWilliams:iconrhynwilliams:
To find oneself's strength, one must first find weakness
Fri Nov 7, 2014, 2:59 PM
Punkboyart1970:iconpunkboyart1970:
Shhhhh I'm whispering this! HELLO
Fri Nov 7, 2014, 1:17 AM
TzOrr:icontzorr:
Hey great platform you have. Upset I missed the creature post! Hopefully can earn a feature one day :D staying tuned
Sat Nov 1, 2014, 8:06 PM
EranFolio:iconeranfolio:
Thank you for the subscription. =)
Wed Oct 29, 2014, 9:00 PM
dancingkittens02:icondancingkittens02:
I am scared
Wed Oct 29, 2014, 9:24 AM
Firozart:iconfirozart:
hi, just curious what happened with the horoscope challenge??? still waiting for the winner announcement.
Mon Oct 27, 2014, 9:13 PM
Chocolatekitty27:iconchocolatekitty27:
Hi :3
Sat Oct 25, 2014, 2:23 PM
rogurto-draws-things:iconrogurto-draws-things:
I AM LIEK, YELLING RIGHT NOW
Sun Oct 19, 2014, 6:24 AM
Nobody

Watchers

Visitors

:iconhann-nya:
hann-nya
Nov 27, 2014
6:38 pm
:iconxxnightstripexx:
XxNightstripexX
Nov 27, 2014
6:17 pm
:iconbittythebat:
BittyTheBat
Nov 27, 2014
6:14 pm
:icongfortress:
GFORTRESS
Nov 27, 2014
6:13 pm
:iconmollygrodriguez:
MollyGRodriguez
Nov 27, 2014
6:09 pm

Activity


Storytellers of the Future

Thu Nov 27, 2014, 2:02 PM
Storyteller by hyenacub by techgnotic












What kind of new narratives will 21st Century storytellers create for our changing world?







Brain Games host Jason Silva tackled that question in a two-minute video called "Lucid Dreaming," outlining the tremendous opportunities (and challenges) facing 21st Century storytellers. As our relationship to technology evolves, the stories we tell each other will change as well.


It’s always fun to imagine what the future will look like and how we will tell stories in this new world.


Silva used culture writer Erik Davis' description of immersive storytelling, a way to create a sort of lucid dream for the reader or viewer:



Immersive works of art or entertainment are increasingly not content to simply produce a new range of sensations. Instead, they often function as portals into other worlds."


— Erik Davis




Silva also quoted Hamlet on the Holodeck: The Future of Narrative in Cyberspace by Janet H. Murray, a scholarly book looking at the future of storytelling. Silva explained how readers and viewers interact with a story:



So powerful is our desire to be immersed that it's not just that we suspend disbelief, but that we actually create belief--using our sophisticated intelligence to reinforce our belief in the story world, rather than to question it. We actively metabolize belief through story ... The narratives of the future have the potential to transform what it means to be human to employ landscapes of the mind and turn subjective experience into a living, breathing painting; a wake-walking dream.”


— Janet H. Murray



Murray's book was published in 1997, but it is still very relevant for readers, viewers and creators. She raised questions that still need to be answered as technology evolves.


Here is an inspiring passage from her book:


I find myself anticipating a new kind of storyteller, one who is half hacker, half bard. The spirit of the hacker is one of the great creative wellsprings of our time, causing the inanimate circuits to sing with ever more individualized and quirky voices; the spirit of the bard is eternal and irreplaceable, telling us what we are doing here and what we mean to one another. I am drawn to imagining a cyberdrama of the future by the same fascination that draws me to the Victorian novel. I see glimmers of a medium that is capacious and broadly expressive, a medium capable of capturing both the hairbreadth movements of individual human consciousness and the colossal crosscurrents of global society.


What do you think? Who are the writers leading this storytelling revolution?


The wonders of narrative immersion possible through new tech advances are truly amazing.  My only worry is that as with every other academic subject our youth are slipping in due to disuse, the intellectual muscles that created the worlds in which we as young readers had suspended disbelief are beginning to atrophy.


Children’s stories, or for that matter stories for any age group, should not rise or fall on how well the illustrators and animators built the backgrounds I see in my 3D virtual reality wraparound glasses.  At a certain point, pure storytelling (great writing) is going to begin becoming just another element in the overall narrative, and with its primacy reduced, become all the weaker and mundane.













Your Thoughts






  1. Have you ever had a favorite novel spoiled by a bad TV or film adaptation?

  2. Have you ever watched a movie before reading the book, only to find the adaptation more exciting and thoughtful and satisfying than anything in the original source material?








Storytellers of the Future
What kind of new narratives will 21st Century storytellers create for our changing world? Brain Games host Jason Silva tackled that question in a two-minute video called "Lucid Dreaming," outlining the tremendous opportunities (and challenges) facing 21st Century storytellers. As our relationship to technology evolves, the stories we tell each other will change as well.
Loading...
My Jackson Pollock Nine by DarkLinkFire











Just as Dada and surrealism had been the art world’s mocking response to the world’s failed progressive pretensions in response to the anti-human horror of World War I, the art movement that blew up in the wake of World War II’s repeat performance was “abstract expressionism.”









It was deliberatively non-figurative. It told the viewer no story. It was not meant to “mean” anything. It was no more than evidence of the artist still alive, surviving, still creating art in the wake of the second devastation of everything modernist and human. It’s bold declaration of art now being detached from meaning, narrative, historical perspective or progressive purpose made New York the new center of the art world. It’s boldest representative was Jackson Pollock.


Some critics complained about Pollock’s process of “drip painting” on canvases spread out on warehouse floors. He “attacked” the canvas from all four sides until he was satisfied with the composition. This, said critics, was “performance art” and that the finished artworks were of little value, as they were just souvenirs of the “art event.” Pollock replied that all his art only had value and meaning for him in the moment of completion.  This did not make the “old school” critics happy.


What should have been Jackson Pollock’s moment of vindication as an artist was also the beginning of the end of everything he was trying to express about art.


Pollock’s moment in the sun was four pages in the August 8, 1949 edition of Life (Magazine) headlined “Is he the greatest living painter in the United States?”














LIFE (Magazine)
(Aug 8, 1949)






Pollock’s greatest works, his drip paintings, were created between 1947 and 1950. The Life (Magazine) article brought fame and celebrity into Pollock’s life. After 1951, he dumped the drip method and began experimenting with what were arguably more salable paintings, perhaps not coincidentally unrelated with his move to a more commercial high profile gallery. He may have sensed that the new demand from collectors was forcing him to make artistic compromises. Or he may have just been being crushed under the pressure to produce. But for whatever reason, this is when his severe, eventually fatal, alcoholism began.









In 1955, Pollock created his last two paintings


He spent 1956 making sculptures constructed of wire and plaster. On August 11, 1956, a drunken Pollock crashed his car less than a mile from his house, killing himself and Edith Metzger. Pollock’s mistress, the artist Ruth Kligman, survived the crash.


Jackson Pollock was a brilliant artist whose life is a study of complex and ironic contradictions. He championed the abstract expressionist cause of art being free of any “meaning” and artists being the anonymous creators of that “meaningless” art. And yet, his brilliant drip paintings still inspire art lovers’ lives and he was made a shining star of the “new art” despite his preferring to remain in the shadows. He fought to be a revolutionary artist struggling against all official academic maxims about the meaning and value of art. He sought to be a “pure” artist, true to his ideals, yet he began cutting artistic corners once the title of Abstract King had been bequeathed to him and needed to be defended.


Pollock hated the commercial aspects of art and the false values that defined any artwork’s worth, e.g. the fame and notoriety of the artist vs. the art itself. And yet he fell into the trap of living up to his hype once the money started finally coming in. How sadly common it is that the battering the egos of young artists sustain in their struggle for success leaves them too weakened to defend their most cherished personal convictions when success finally does arrive.









Your Thoughts




  1. Do you feel an artist should be trying to express a meaning, or even just evoke a mood or feeling, with the art he or she creates?  Or should art, as much as possible, be simply a stimulant or prompt for the viewer’s own unique personal response?
  2. Should art be “used” by the viewer as an inspirational aid in their work, or should it be a message to be deciphered or understood?  Or are both “consumer uses” of art acceptable.
  3. Is it ever possible for an abstract piece of art to be completely purely “meaningless?”
  4. What do you like or dislike about Pollock’s drip paintings?
  5. Who is your favorite abstract artist?  Can you explain why?










Jackson Pollock: Champion of the New Art
Do you feel an artist should be trying to express a meaning, or even just evoke a mood or feeling, with the art he or she creates? Or should art, as much as possible, be simply a stimulant or prompt for the viewer’s own unique personal response?
Loading...

Collection: For The Love of Dog

Thu Nov 27, 2014, 1:53 PM
A Song For Man's Best Friend by DiamonEyes







For the love of dog


The problem with lovers and spouses is that they have their own separate lives. They can’t always wake in the morning to a day of loving you until it’s time to close their eyes to sleep at night with their heads filled with thoughts of you. There are some activities necessary for their human existence that must be attended to, no matter how much you need a foot massage. Not so with dogs. Your dog lives only for you. Dogs are instinctive pack animals and you are the Leader of the Pack.


Scientists now report that your dog “reads” your pheromones and other subtle scent indicators to know if you’re happy or sad and depressed. Then he’ll know whether to raucously fetch you his leash for some fun in the dog park, or quietly rest his head on your shoulder to comfort you. But dog owners have never needed science to tell them their dog loves them best.









Collection: For The Love of Dog
The problem with lovers and spouses is that they have their own separate lives. They can’t always wake in the morning to a day of loving you until it’s time to close their eyes to sleep at night with their heads filled with thoughts of you. There are some activities necessary for their human existence that must be attended to, no matter how much you need a foot massage. Not so with dogs. Your dog lives only for you. Dogs are instinctive pack animals and you are the Leader of the Pack. Scientists now report that your dog “reads” your pheromones and other subtle scent indicators to know if you’re happy or sad and depressed. Then he’ll know whether to raucously fetch you his leash for some fun in the dog park, or quietly rest his head on your shoulder to comfort you. But dog owners have never needed science to tell them their dog loves them best.
Loading...

The Google Doodle as Web Icon

Wed Nov 26, 2014, 8:05 PM
Google homepage art I did by jimlee00










For those of you keeping current, the Google logo on the Google homepage is occasionally altered, sometimes to bring attention to an event, sometimes to celebrate famous artists and scientists on their birthdays. These clever alterations are “doodles” and they are often created by guest artists.







The first “Google Doodle” was to celebrate the Burning Man Festival in 1998.


Soon after, Google heads Larry Page and Sergey Brin asked intern Dennis Hwang to design a doodle for Bastille Day. This was the origin of the special team of Google “doodlers.” The doodles have evolved from being simply clever graffiti to becoming animated to now being interactive. As of 2014, Google has published over 2,000 regional and international doodles.



At DeviantArt we have our own special preference for doodles celebrating artists like Warhol, da Vinci, John Lennon, Kurosawa, H.G. Wells, etc. The latest honoree to be Google–Doodled is Henri de Toulouse–Lautrec, the post–impressionist painter and iconic figure representing a historic time and place of unfettered artistic freedom and vibrancy, “La Belle Epoque” (the “Beautiful Era”) in Paris from the 1870s to the start of WWI in 1914.


Henri was born to the aristocracy, but suffered from a genetic disorder that made his legs stop growing in childhood.


He was forced to live with the indignities of having an adult’s torso set atop a child’s legs. He was a 5’1” man who compensated for his lack of physical stature by immersing himself in and eventually becoming a giant in the arts, alongside his fellow post–impressionists Cezanne, Van Gogh and Gauguin.







Henri became a symbol of the Parisian bohemian bon vivant.






He was famously commissioned by the Moulin Rouge cabaret to create a series of posters for advertising. The nightclub was so pleased by the results that they installed a permanent display of Lautrec paintings and granted Henri permanent reserved seating. Prostitutes were a favorite subject of his art, and he became their favorite portraitist, often accepting a madams’ invitations to move into their brothels for months at a time. Lautrec gave painting lessons to one of his models, Suzanne Valadon, who went on to become the first woman painter admitted to the Societe Nationale des Beaux–Arts (in 1894).


Henri died a few months before his 37th birthday at his family’s estate in Malrome.


In a career spanning less than 20 years, Lautrec produced at least 737 canvases, 275 watercolors, 363 prints and posters, 5,084 drawings and some ceramic and stained glass work. These are estimates because so much of his work has been lost.


Henri is also thought to have invented the Tremblement de Terre, an alcoholic beverage consisting of ½ absinthe and ½ cognac.










Your Thoughts






  1. What’s the cleverest Google-Doodle you’ve ever seen?

  2. Do you not mind, or do you still resent, intrusive advertising when it manages to be really artistically imaginative and well-executed?

  3. What is your favorite version of artwork as headline on the web?









The Google Doodle as Web Icon
For those of you keeping current, the Google logo on the Google homepage is occasionally altered, sometimes to bring attention to an event, sometimes to celebrate famous artists and scientists on their birthdays. These clever alterations are “doodles” and they are often created by guest artists. The first “Google Doodle” was to celebrate the Burning Man Festival in 1998.
Loading...

Wonder Woman Reborn

Wed Nov 26, 2014, 8:02 PM
Supers V Wonder by JoshJ81










The collective fan community sigh of relief that a female director has been chosen to bring the Amazonian Goddess to life on the big screen has been echoing across the web ever since Monday’s announcement that Michelle McClaren had won that coveted crown. Here at DA HQ, we can’t help but imagine what Joss Whedon might have done with the character.


Pray no one involved in the Catwoman movie gets close to it.



It’s not just that Wonder Woman is poised to become an integral element in the upcoming Warner Bros/DC Universe big screen explosion, more importantly it’s the current climate in which she is being brought forth as female Icon. It seems Warner Bros. has chosen to make this a period piece and set the film in the 20’s. Interesting on so many levels. Her comic history is really tied more into the 1940’s and World War 2. Her creation origins is a much larger story we’ll delve into soon.


Captain Marvel, another female super hero, this one from the already established Marvel universe will actually hit the big screen first and will be set in the present day. Another sign that Marvel are listening closer to the fan community? We’re pretty sure that Kevin Feige won’t let this become another Elektra.


Over at camp Dr. Who, producers there just hired Catherine Tregenna, their first female writer in seven years, totaling five in its history. It’s a shame as the shows first producer was a woman, Verity Lambert, and this in light of the season finale revelation that a Time Lord can in fact regenerate as a woman.









Your Thoughts






  1. Do you think the move to set Wonder Woman’s first film as a period piece a sign they are going to honor her origins in the comic or open it up to deal historically with the women’s rights movement as a whole?

  2. How important is it to the integrity of a Wonder Woman re-boot that women occupy the lead positions bringing her to life on the big screen?

  3. Maybe what is your favorite Wonder Woman outfit? Please share your favorite Wonder Woman deviation in the comments section.









Wonder Woman Reborn
It’s not just that Wonder Woman is poised to become an integral element in the upcoming Warner Bros/DC Universe big screen explosion, more importantly it’s the current climate in which she is being brought forth as female Icon. It seems Warner Bros. has chosen to make this a period piece and set the film in the 20’s. Interesting on so many levels. Her comic history is really tied more into the 1940’s and World War 2. Her creation origins is a much larger story we’ll delve into soon.
Loading...

Storytellers of the Future

Thu Nov 27, 2014, 2:02 PM
Storyteller by hyenacub by techgnotic












What kind of new narratives will 21st Century storytellers create for our changing world?







Brain Games host Jason Silva tackled that question in a two-minute video called "Lucid Dreaming," outlining the tremendous opportunities (and challenges) facing 21st Century storytellers. As our relationship to technology evolves, the stories we tell each other will change as well.


It’s always fun to imagine what the future will look like and how we will tell stories in this new world.


Silva used culture writer Erik Davis' description of immersive storytelling, a way to create a sort of lucid dream for the reader or viewer:



Immersive works of art or entertainment are increasingly not content to simply produce a new range of sensations. Instead, they often function as portals into other worlds."


— Erik Davis




Silva also quoted Hamlet on the Holodeck: The Future of Narrative in Cyberspace by Janet H. Murray, a scholarly book looking at the future of storytelling. Silva explained how readers and viewers interact with a story:



So powerful is our desire to be immersed that it's not just that we suspend disbelief, but that we actually create belief--using our sophisticated intelligence to reinforce our belief in the story world, rather than to question it. We actively metabolize belief through story ... The narratives of the future have the potential to transform what it means to be human to employ landscapes of the mind and turn subjective experience into a living, breathing painting; a wake-walking dream.”


— Janet H. Murray



Murray's book was published in 1997, but it is still very relevant for readers, viewers and creators. She raised questions that still need to be answered as technology evolves.


Here is an inspiring passage from her book:


I find myself anticipating a new kind of storyteller, one who is half hacker, half bard. The spirit of the hacker is one of the great creative wellsprings of our time, causing the inanimate circuits to sing with ever more individualized and quirky voices; the spirit of the bard is eternal and irreplaceable, telling us what we are doing here and what we mean to one another. I am drawn to imagining a cyberdrama of the future by the same fascination that draws me to the Victorian novel. I see glimmers of a medium that is capacious and broadly expressive, a medium capable of capturing both the hairbreadth movements of individual human consciousness and the colossal crosscurrents of global society.


What do you think? Who are the writers leading this storytelling revolution?


The wonders of narrative immersion possible through new tech advances are truly amazing.  My only worry is that as with every other academic subject our youth are slipping in due to disuse, the intellectual muscles that created the worlds in which we as young readers had suspended disbelief are beginning to atrophy.


Children’s stories, or for that matter stories for any age group, should not rise or fall on how well the illustrators and animators built the backgrounds I see in my 3D virtual reality wraparound glasses.  At a certain point, pure storytelling (great writing) is going to begin becoming just another element in the overall narrative, and with its primacy reduced, become all the weaker and mundane.













Your Thoughts






  1. Have you ever had a favorite novel spoiled by a bad TV or film adaptation?

  2. Have you ever watched a movie before reading the book, only to find the adaptation more exciting and thoughtful and satisfying than anything in the original source material?








deviantID

techgnotic
Art is long, life is short, judgement difficult, opportunity transient. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
United States
Current Residence: A Peaceful State
deviantWEAR sizing preference: L
Print preference: As Big As Possible.
Favourite genre of music: Rock. Jazz(Hard Bop). Blues. 80's Metal. Tribal(Aboriginal thru Electronic). Classical.Troubado
Favourite photographer: Sebastio Salgado. Richard Mapplethorpe. Walker Evans. Weegee.
Favourite style of art: Post-impressionist. Abstract-expressionist. The New Digital Vanguard. Contemporary fantasy.
Operating System: OSX
MP3 player of choice: Shuffle
Shell of choice: Any Conch will do.
Wallpaper of choice: French Louis XIV Rococo Style
Skin of choice: Thick enough to persevere and thin enough to feel.
Interests

Journal History

Comments


Add a Comment:
 
:iconcreativeartboyart:
CreativeartboyArt Featured By Owner Nov 5, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
Hello! I would like to know how to write journals that covers all the page when we see it, just like yours. Is that possible for us or its like a feature for dA staff? Your journals are awesome aswell as your art and I would like to do those "big" journals.
Thank you!
Reply
:iconsquidinkblott:
squidinkblott Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
my eye was caught by one of your articles, so I wanted to check out your page. I just wanted to say-
keep being awesome!
Reply
:icondonateallartcreation:

Welcome to AllArtCreation! You joining is very much appreciated :heart:

Be sure to post your artwork to the group :aww: We also have a contest going on currently! Click here to check it out!

:iconallartcreation:

Reply
:icondacevacart:
DacevacArt Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
Nice B|
Reply
:icondcf:
dcf Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2014
:)
Reply
:iconskunk4gwop:
skunk4gwop Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2014
Hey, thanks for mentioning me in your "Italian Masters of Horror" article!
Reply
:iconzicuta:
Zicuta Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Great collections photography and art, very inspiring.
I will be very happy if you feature my work, thanks

Greetings.
Reply
:iconfirozart:
Firozart Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2014  Professional General Artist
Hmmm.... WHAT HAPPENED with the horoscope challenge????
Reply
:icontechgnotic:
techgnotic Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2014
On it's way :)
Reply
:iconelf-cat:
Elf-Cat Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2014  New member Hobbyist General Artist
I would like to report that marymary9090 is possibly a spam account.
Please keep an eye on this person, because spam type scams may occur again, as seen here contraltissimo.deviantart.com/… .
Reply
:iconfirozart:
Firozart Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2014  Professional General Artist
Hmmm, still nothing...regarding the horoscope challenge.

Just curious when it will be completed?
Reply
:iconphoenixacezero:
phoenixacezero Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2014
Hey, are you running into any problem on stash writer?
Reply
:iconemesalvatore:
emesalvatore Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2014
Hi, I wanted to ask if you could donate to me some points. 
Sorry for the inconvenience and thank you!
Reply
:iconinkyfan2342:
Inkyfan2342 Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2014  Student Artist
I said, Devart on that I want to help please let the points
Reply
Add a Comment: