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About Deviant Administrator Art is long, life is short, judgement difficult, opportunity transient. --Johann Wolfgang von GoetheMale/United States Groups :icondepthradius: depthRADIUS
We are listening to each other.
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Deviant for 8 Years
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FOX09

Introducing depthRADIUS

Logo design by Mario Luevanos
Film and animation by Scott Pagan


About depthRADIUS


depthRADIUS is named after the deviantART community that it reflects and represents. Built in service of the largest and most influential community of culture creators and culture responders in the world, this on-line journal explores the depths of the arts world from fine art to the most eminently accessible community arts projects. depthRADIUS endeavors to connect artists and art enthusiasts with other artists and art appreciators from all levels of the arts community, from its most successful stars and innovators to beginners just learning their crafts. The “radius” of this journalistic conversation will extend in its boundaries into arts advocacy, cultural relevancy, education and appreciation.

A Few Recent Journals



“We are all listening to each other.”

:icondepthradius:



You owe reality nothing and the truth about your feelings everything. — Richard Hugo 

82%
827 deviants said True - Please advise.
18%
183 deviants said False - Please advise.

Epiousios

Art

the artist acts like a mediumistic being who, from the labyrinth beyond time and space, seeks his way out to a clearing.

-Marcel Duchamp

Burns Brighter

I want a trouble-maker for a lover,
Blood spiller, blood drinker, a heart of flame,
Who quarrels with the sky and fights with fate,
Who burns like fire on the rushing sea.

From Rumi’s Kolliyaat-e Shams-e Tabrizi

True

Among those whom I like or admire, I can find no common denominator, but among those whom I love, I can: all of them make me laugh.
--W. H. Auden

Do You Realize? by The Flaming Lips -- Lyrics

Do You Realize - that you have the most beautiful face
Do You Realize - we're floating in space
Do You Realize - that happiness makes you cry
Do You Realize - that everyone you know someday will die

And instead of saying all of your goodbyes - let them know
You realize that life goes fast
It's hard to make the good things last
You realize the sun doesn't go down
It's just an illusion caused by the world spinning round

Do You Realize - that you have the most beautiful face

By The Way...

The best things in life are not things.

Shoutbox

rogurto-draws-things:iconrogurto-draws-things:
I AM LIEK, YELLING RIGHT NOW
Sun Oct 19, 2014, 6:24 AM
Genesis-07:icongenesis-07:
Hi :3 donate me?
Tue Oct 14, 2014, 4:28 PM
Just-To-Look1:iconjust-to-look1:
Hi. SHOUT SHOUT SHOUT SHOUT :D
Sat Oct 11, 2014, 10:39 PM
ZigtheZag:iconzigthezag:
why am I shouting? why can't I whisper or say things in a normal voice?
Sat Oct 11, 2014, 7:34 PM
qeva
may we be friends? :3
Mon Aug 25, 2014, 12:40 AM
ColourlessGirl:iconcolourlessgirl:
i wish i knew more homestuck fans!
Sat Aug 23, 2014, 11:14 PM
WolfPawCreator:iconwolfpawcreator:
There will always be people who are willing to help you.
Fri Aug 22, 2014, 11:25 PM
Team-Butch:iconteam-butch:
The cat turns blue at midnight
Fri Aug 22, 2014, 7:27 PM
UzumakiNaomiOC:iconuzumakinaomioc:
Hi. How are u?
Fri Aug 22, 2014, 4:05 PM
prettyprincess45:iconprettyprincess45:
Hello peeps!!!!!
Thu Jul 24, 2014, 2:37 PM
Nobody

Watchers

Visitors

:iconbrooklynturbo:
BrooklynTurbo
Oct 23, 2014
12:10 pm
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Lucas-SG
Oct 23, 2014
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KibuStar
Oct 23, 2014
12:08 pm
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cookieloveroverhere
Oct 23, 2014
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Art-King-101
Oct 23, 2014
12:07 pm

Activity


Brian Kesinger: Character Driven

Wed Oct 22, 2014, 10:39 AM
Screen Shot 2014-10-22 at 4.28.13 PM by techgnotic
















Disney Artist Brian Kesinger on Creating Story through Character










Foreword by techgnotic


It is with great pleasure we welcome Brian Kesinger as a guest writer to the Today Page Editorial Team. Considering his authentic citizenship within the deviantART community, his thoughts and insights will be of great value to all aspiring artists, illustrators, writers and others involved in any creative endeavor. For over 18 years, Brian has worked for Walt Disney Studios on films like Big Hero 6, Winnie the Pooh, Tarzan, Tangled, Wreck It Ralph and Bolt. Brian is author and illustrator of his own octovictorian creation, the wildly popular Walking Your Octopus, featuring Otto and Victoria, about a young turn-of-the-century London lady of distinction and her pet octopus.



















Take a moment and think about your favorite movie. Now imagine that movie without the main character as you know them in it. I think it is important to make a distinction between the plot of a story and the arc of your main character.








The plot is a series of events that result in a character going through an emotional arc. You can briefly define a character arc as how a character feels and acts at the beginning of the story versus how the feel and act in the end. In Dicken's Christmas Carol (1843), Ebenezer Scrooge hates Christmas and at the end he loves it. That is an oversimplification of his arc. The plot is there in order to provide obstacles and choices to show the the audience who they are and what their attitude toward their situation is. A good plot keeps you interested in the story but a good character will make you want to rewatch the movie over and over again. I personally a fan of movies that have very simple plots, because those films leave much more room for character development. One way to look at a story is a series of choices presented to the main character. As a storyteller, the more time you put into your character the easier it will be for you to make those choices for your character be truth.


One way to look at a story is a series of choices made in creating the main character. As a storyteller, the more time you put into your character the easier it will be for you to make those choices for your character be truthful.







Truthfulness is talked about a lot when discussing character creation. Fictional characters are, of course, untrue. They do not exist in the real world. They are made up. You must give them reality with relatable traits. Let’s say your main character is a farm hand. How does he feel about that? Does he enjoy the hard labor, or is he bored out of his mind? Let's choose the latter.  Note that we are not talking about plot, just discussing character. Does this farm-boy get along with his parents? Let's add mystery by making him an orphan. So we now have the highly relatable story of a bored young man with a decision to make.  Should he continue his duties on the farm – or answer an inner calling to explore the rest of his world?  We know this character.  Some of us are this character. So when Luke Skywalker makes his choice, it rings true, because his character has already been established as someone we understand, someone who wants more out of life.  We can all relate to his situation.  His story will be a bit more exciting than most tales of fugitive farm-boys, but even Star Wars might have bored us had we not been pre-invested in such a relatable character by skilled storytellers.



As an illustrator, my job is to create a believable characters visually. At Disney, it is not uncommon for us to start drawing before a writer has even been hired to write a script. Animation and art are visual media. A picture is worth a thousand words. Drawing your character is one of the best ways to kick off the generation of those words. It’s all in the details. How your character dresses, what sort of hair they have, are they big or scrawny? All these questions can be answered and explored through the drawing process. When we work on our films it is common for the character designers and story artists to work at the same time because one department constantly informs the other.


I love this part of the process, as you draw your character and you explore all aspects of them and ideas start to gel. You put one image next to another and suddenly a story starts to develop, to talk to you. It is very exciting. We had an interesting challenge in creating the character of baymax for the up coming film big hero six.


I asked Joe Mateo, head of story on the film to talk a little about the difficulties that arose when creating a character with out traditional features.











We knew that Baymax was going to be a challenge given his limited amount of facial features to express an emotional range.  It's amazing though, what you can achieve with those charming dot eyes combined with a subtle head tilt, a well timed blink, and body gestures. These things plus line delivery can be very effective in expressing  different emotions. We're careful though how much emotions we want Baymax to show given that he is just a non sentient robot... or is he?”


Joe Mateo, Head of story on Big Hero Six





















On the film Frozen we were tasked with taking a fairy tale “princess movie” and putting a fresh spin on it. One way that we did that was by explore the characters of Anna & Elsa and creating a believable relationship between the two of them. Paul Briggs, head of story on Frozen speaks more about that here.












One of the great things we had working for us was the tropes of princess films we had done in the past. Audiences already had an expectation we would deliver the familiar romantic love story... a romantic kiss from a prince/knight in shining armor would save the the day. Jennifer Lee and Chris Buck knew they wanted to deliver something fresh and different and took the idea from the original Snow Queen story that "an act of true love will thaw a frozen heart" and coupled that with a story about two sisters. The movie really started to focus more about family love than romantic love. The challenge was crafting two siblings that couldn't have that love between one another. We had Elsa, who was hiding a power that she thinks will hurt or kill her sister. So she lives in fear and is afraid to share her love towards her sister. We developed Anna as being fearless but she lives in a world where we she wants to give her love but it is never reciprocated by her sister. She holds onto that true love for her sister though and it's ultimately the thing that saves the day and protects and saves her sister. Anna makes the biggest choice in the movie which is she sacrifices her life to save her sister—an act of true love.”


Paul Briggs, Head of story on Frozen




















Interviews Brian Kesinger's Q&A with the Following Deviant Artists








:iconbriankesinger:

In creating your Lost Kids graphic novel what were some ways that you made your characters believable teenagers even though they are inhabiting a fantastical world?






:iconfelipecagno:

Felipe Cagno


It's all about really turning your characters into real people, people that you could walk past in the streets and that means tons of research and world building. For every character in the Lost Kids comics I have these extensive character sheets with dozens of questions ranging from their family background, their homes, where they grew up in, the environment around them, to their biggest fears, their hopes and dreams, their psyche, etc.



All that comes into play and you must know your characters better than yourselves, you really must ask the tough questions and come up with interesting answers. A kid growing up in Brooklyn, NY, will most definitely talk and behave very differently than a kid growing up in Orange County, CA. Do they come from a rich family, a blue-collar one, from poverty, where do they go to school, are they outgoing or shy, do they use slang, or perhaps they speak perfect English, are they popular or outcasts, what are their deepest secrets and so forth.


And the most interesting task I had to go through was actually finding a way of these very different kids that should not get along, get together for this adventure. Good storytelling comes from conflict and there is nothing more boring than seeing characters agreeing on paper or screen, you want them to duke it out, you want them to have completely different opinions about the stuff that matters so you can exploit different points of view on a given subject and let the audience choose sides.


Believable teenagers have very strong opinions and views of their world, I just made sure to get all that right even before writing a word of the script.








:iconbriankesinger:

Can you talk a little about how your characters developed from random sketches to the storylines in your web comic?






:iconshingworks:

Der-shing Helmer



I don't actually sketch randomly and home storylines come out, it's pretty much the opposite... I come up with story elements that I find interesting and work to develop a character that might fit into the scenario in a unique way. For example, in The Meek, I wanted to write a story about a girl who doesn't care much for societal pressures. She started out in sketches as several types of girl, but with the goal of a story in mind, eventually developed in the my character Angora who is introduced as not wearing clothes (that portrayal is pivotal to her essential nature). I don't think the character would have been quite as effective if I had just been drawing naked women, and then tried to mould a story around that visual.


For the new comic that I am making (and will be posting more art of to deviantArt as well), I'm doing something similar; trying to create a certain vision of the future and the people who live there. With the future in mind, I get to create characters that represent my hopes and expectations, vs just randomly hoping to strike gold. My general advice is always to give a context to your sketches, even if you don't ultimately use them... it will help your characters develop into living people who feel like they might really exist somewhere.








:iconbriankesinger:

When creating your character Veloce Visrin, what were some of the choices you made in designing her look and outfit to help tell the reader what she is all about?






:iconshilin:

Shilin Huang



I've given Veloce outfits meant for show, as well as casual outfits for the story she is in. The more story-oriented decisions were made with her casual outfit. Naturally, her look should immediately convey her character, because insignificant details on how a character chooses to dress himself/herself are usually a good reflection of their values. I've kept her outfit casual and unimpressive,despite her being the main character, to match her preference for staying away from the spotlight and blending into the crowds. Her clothes are also kept loose fitting rather than skintight, her hair kept free and not diligently kept, giving her a more relaxed air. However, she did come from a respected/feared family, and a hint of the fact that she is supposed to be an upper-class lady still comes across through the halter top, which is the same top/dress featured in her other, more extravagant and impressive outfits, covered up under the guise of her hoodie and otherwise unassuming look.








:iconbriankesinger:

Your character drawings are so expressive. What are some tips for drawing animal characters with such human emotions while still maintaining their animalistic anatomy?






:icontracyjb:

Tracy Butler


Thank you! Foremost, I’d say it’s important to get to know the subject matter. Gathering some overarching observational knowledge about anatomy, gesture and expression is pretty vital to drawing convincing pictures of such things. It also applies to the ensuing Frankensteinian drawing experiments that I would recommend as a generally effective approach to designing characters that fall somewhere between human and animal (though I’d argue that distinction is mostly philosophical).  Do a lot of sketching, in other words.



Human capacity for self-aware emotional complexities aside, it’d be difficult to mark a clear distinction between human and animal emotions. Among other mammals in particular, there’s quite a lot of overlap in the way we express basic things like fear, dejection and excitement, in fact. Whether human or wolf, a lowered head, fixed stare and curled lip is unmistakably aggressive.  That sort of thing can certainly work to the artist’s advantage when drawing an animalistic character meant to emote in a relatable human fashion.  Further appending the expression with the animal’s telltale posturing - raised hackles, pinned ears, bared fangs - can be mixed in to varying degrees of bestial and dramatic.  The more minute facial features add a layer of human nuance and specificity - the smallest adjustment can put an entirely different spin on an expression. For the given example, downward angled “angry” eyebrows would be well in line with the straightforward appearance of aggression, but simply arching one of the brows higher than the other can turn it into an expression of calculated anger.  Symmetrically high arching brows could make the expression more excited or crazed; furrowed brows could be used to convey a sort of consternated anger, and so forth.



Of course, species that don’t communicate in ways that are especially decipherable to humans and critters with physiognomies that don’t lend themselves well to forming human expressions can present design challenges that might require some careful finagling. To use a popular example, note the dramatically shortened heads of My Little Pony characters as compared to realistic equine heads.  Much of the animal appearance of the face is sacrificed, clustering the features together into an alignment more closely resembling a (cartoon-like) human.  This way, the expressions are eminently readable, never inadvertently shifting from cute to awkward.  In other situations, preserving the animalistic mien might be the greater priority over rendering consistently appealing human expressions. If you ever find yourself trying to draw chagrin on an anteater, consider that in some cases, embracing a bit of the awkwardness might not be a bad thing.  It can make for some defining, memorable characteristics.


My advice overall is to approach whatever abstracted combination of anatomies are at hand as an advantage rather than a limitation to building an expressive character.  The human and animal aspects each bring a toolkit array of physical features, gestures, behaviors and idiosyncrasies to utilize and draw inspiration from - all the more resources with which the character may exude life and emotion, presence and personality.








:iconbriankesinger:

What led you to pick Korea as the location for your fish out of water story of frankie*SNATCH? And how does that specific location inform what situations your character goes through?






:iconlynseylew:

Lynsey Wo


When I initially came up with the concept for frankie*SNATCH back in 2001, I wanted to base it in a large, modern city in the Far East. At the time, Japan was experiencing a huge popularity boom (certainly within the target audience I was wanting to reach) and I wanted to avoid following that trend. After a little bit of research, Seoul seemed to contain the fast pace, bright lights, cosmopolitan scene I was looking for. In these early stages, a strong visual setting was all I was after, and Seoul fitted that need perfectly.



Frankie*SNATCH has always been a character-driven plot, and whilst the location had never been hugely influential as a whole, as the story developed darker, controversial issues, I still needed to make sure it was still appropriate. For example, a major theme of substance abuse within the story lead me to research the sort of healthcare and treatment available for those suffering with addictions, and how this sort of issue is perceived and handled by Korean society as a whole. This research directly impacted on how the character(s) confronting this issue would handle it, particularly from the societal angle. This idea of such an old-fashioned taboo against the backdrop of an otherwise modern, diverse city was something I found interesting, but it also made me realise the importance of making sure the characters were believable enough for them to address the issues presented to them with as little help from the outside as possible.












Questions for Brian Kesinger




  1. Brian has volunteered to answer any questions you might have in a series of video updates we will post soon, so keep your eyes and ears peeled for a shout-out from him.


    Leave your questions for Brian in the comments below.






















Every year, the United Nations sets a theme for their International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. The 2014 theme is…



Leave no one behind: think, decide and act together against extreme poverty.”






I n a world as progressed as we believe ourselves to be it seems that poverty is still winning and growing. Income disparity in “advanced” economies such as the United States is growing rapidly with the top 1% gaining and the middle class slipping precariously. The Pope and other world leaders have identified income disparity as the greatest danger facing the world. In the former Soviet-influenced states, oligarchs amass wealth putting every capitalist of the last two centuries to shame while the general population slides deeper into deprivation.


Africa, East Asia and many parts of Central and South America remain as poor as ever even as local economic opportunity grows. In North Korea the population is simply poor.  In China, people work themselves to death while their economy is touted as the next great consumer market. We can only guess at what it means to be in a factory city working in a factory, for factory wages, without any suggestion that you will ever evolve to any other place or level. Another kind of poverty?


Of late the press increasingly carries stories that the very wealthy are “pitching-in” to solve world hunger or eradicate malaria or fund micro-banking initiatives. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Clinton Initiative, Mark Zuckerberg from Facebook and his wife all announce in their names their latest “good intentions”. But the fact remains that this reinforces the notion that only the very wealthy can afford to care about the poor.



Governments and religious organizations provide massive funding for programs aimed at the poor all over the world. But even without statistical study we can tell its a thin layer of support.


Poverty breeds war. We spend more money on those. And then we spend on refugees. And then they join the ranks in deep poverty.








President Johnson in the United States announced a war on poverty only to see that dream abandoned for a war on Vietnam instead. This repeated over and over in every part of the world. Leaders and nations with great hopes and intentions towards the poor sidelined by war and greed.


Historically it has always been the working people, not the wealthy, who have proportionally donated massively more of their income to aid the impoverished at home and around the world either directly through charitable donations or through taxation. When workers’ income is falling backward, along with their lifestyles, how can they be expected to come to the aid of the impoverished? Survival is uppermost on the minds of most workers right now, not charity, let alone spending time strategizing for the great coming together of upper and middle classes for a joint effort to eradicate poverty forever.



So the question as to who will truly be “thinking and deciding how to act together” now to end extreme poverty will probably be the question on the lips of those who have read this far.



But how do you/we decide to act?



What in your daily life can contribute to aid the poor or pull down the forces that push people into poverty? How could the arts contribute beyond simply placing the reality of poverty in front of us all in pictures and in words? Could there be a universal symbol of relief, care and comfort without religious overtones to unify all world cultures? How can we teach compassion with our art?












Your Thoughts






  1. As an artist do you feel you have a special responsibility to use your creativity to invent art projects that bring awareness of injustice and suffering?

  2. Have you ever sent art to your government representatives as a way to initiate action by them?

  3. Have you found any art projects in your neighborhood or country which focus on poverty and on providing solutions to hunger, housing, and support for the disenfranchised?

  4. Do you feel in your heart of hearts that the haves and the have-nots will one day recognize each other as one family?









Extreme Poverty: Who Will Heed The Call?
Every year, the United Nations sets a theme for their International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. The 2014 theme is… "Leave no one behind: think, decide and act together against extreme poverty.”

Writers: techgnotic 
Designers:seoul-child 
Curation: MARX77, makepictures, spotted
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Movie Poster





About


It's October and the sacred 31 days of Halloween are upon us-time to get your gore on! The chill is in the air, the leaves are on the ground, and Halloween candy has been out since Labor Day. So while you’re waiting in the Starbucks line for an overpriced double pumpkin spice whatever, pass the time with this year’s scary movies reviews!







Frankenstein (1931)



Review by RWSlavin



The success in Spring 1931 of “Dracula” sent Universal execs on a raid of the public domain properties for a Monster Movie #2 follow–up.  They emerged from the vaults with Mary Shelley’s 1818 gothic treasure, “Frankenstein.” Bela Lugosi, whose Dracula had rescued Universal a few months previously, was offered the role of Frankenstein’s Monster, but passed, because the Monster had even fewer lines than Dracula did. Director James Whale remembered the particularly expressive eyes of a bit player in gangster movies, an asset well–suited to giving the grunting, voiceless Monster some element of humanity. And so it was that Boris Karloff became King of the Universal horror pictures. His ability to “speak” with only his eyes and hand gestures and elicit a real pathos from audiences, along with the frights, revealed him to be a multi–dimensional talent — even as he was being forever “typed” as “just” a horror movie actor.


The Universal “Frankenstein” begins with a nod to original author Shelley’s existential horror of a stitched–together being living beyond death. Beyond God? (i.e., “Alive” but soul–less?) We all remember Dr. Frankenstein crying out, “It’ alive!” But few have heard the next censored–everywhere line, “Now I know what it feels like to be God!” These are scary questions. But this is a monster movie, so it rapidly switches gears and becomes a less philosophical monster–on–the–loose story. The death of little Maria is as scary as existential angst, and Boris Karloff somehow made audiences feel compassion for the Monster even as it killed an innocent child. Then there’s a quick wrap–up. There’s the now iconic peasants with torches and pitchforks chase to find the monster. He’s trapped in the old windmill, which is lit ablaze. He is now dead — until the decision on sequels is made. And, in fact, “Bride of –” (1935) and “Son of –” (1939) are that rarest of movie rarities: sequels that outshine the original. The magic of the original “Frankenstein” is that what should have been just a chase–down–the–monster flick was elevated to something so much more by Boris Karloff’s magnificent performance.










Mini Horror Reviews - Frankenstein (1931)
It's October and the sacred 31 days of Halloween are upon us-time to get your gore on! The chill is in the air, the leaves are on the ground, and Halloween candy has been out since Labor Day. So while you’re waiting in the Starbucks line for an overpriced double pumpkin spice whatever, pass the time with this year’s scary movies reviews!

Writers: RWSlavin
Designers: marioluevanos

For more articles like this, please visit depthRADIUS
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Collection: Road Trip

Mon Oct 20, 2014, 7:30 PM







Road Trip


From mass migrations of multitudes to solitary quests into college, wandering to see new places and people is as necessary to healthy human nutrition as daily meals. We base the appeal of nations on how easy they are to enter or exit. We think in terms of our own “freedom” in how quickly we could “up and leave” on short notice. Hitting the road has always been its own reward, regardless the destination. It’s as if nothing really exists until we’ve traveled there and seen it with our own eyes. The path to and from is part of everywhere on Earth.








Collection: Road Trip
Hitting the road has always been its own reward, regardless the destination. It’s as if nothing really exists until we’ve traveled there and seen it with our own eyes. The path to and from is part of everywhere on Earth.
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DO YOU BELIEVE IN THE BEAUTY OF ABSENCE?

Be Still by ricochet188










Every year, the United Nations sets a theme for their International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. The 2014 theme is…



Leave no one behind: think, decide and act together against extreme poverty.”






I n a world as progressed as we believe ourselves to be it seems that poverty is still winning and growing. Income disparity in “advanced” economies such as the United States is growing rapidly with the top 1% gaining and the middle class slipping precariously. The Pope and other world leaders have identified income disparity as the greatest danger facing the world. In the former Soviet-influenced states, oligarchs amass wealth putting every capitalist of the last two centuries to shame while the general population slides deeper into deprivation.


Africa, East Asia and many parts of Central and South America remain as poor as ever even as local economic opportunity grows. In North Korea the population is simply poor.  In China, people work themselves to death while their economy is touted as the next great consumer market. We can only guess at what it means to be in a factory city working in a factory, for factory wages, without any suggestion that you will ever evolve to any other place or level. Another kind of poverty?


Of late the press increasingly carries stories that the very wealthy are “pitching-in” to solve world hunger or eradicate malaria or fund micro-banking initiatives. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Clinton Initiative, Mark Zuckerberg from Facebook and his wife all announce in their names their latest “good intentions”. But the fact remains that this reinforces the notion that only the very wealthy can afford to care about the poor.



Governments and religious organizations provide massive funding for programs aimed at the poor all over the world. But even without statistical study we can tell its a thin layer of support.


Poverty breeds war. We spend more money on those. And then we spend on refugees. And then they join the ranks in deep poverty.








President Johnson in the United States announced a war on poverty only to see that dream abandoned for a war on Vietnam instead. This repeated over and over in every part of the world. Leaders and nations with great hopes and intentions towards the poor sidelined by war and greed.


Historically it has always been the working people, not the wealthy, who have proportionally donated massively more of their income to aid the impoverished at home and around the world either directly through charitable donations or through taxation. When workers’ income is falling backward, along with their lifestyles, how can they be expected to come to the aid of the impoverished? Survival is uppermost on the minds of most workers right now, not charity, let alone spending time strategizing for the great coming together of upper and middle classes for a joint effort to eradicate poverty forever.



So the question as to who will truly be “thinking and deciding how to act together” now to end extreme poverty will probably be the question on the lips of those who have read this far.



But how do you/we decide to act?



What in your daily life can contribute to aid the poor or pull down the forces that push people into poverty? How could the arts contribute beyond simply placing the reality of poverty in front of us all in pictures and in words? Could there be a universal symbol of relief, care and comfort without religious overtones to unify all world cultures? How can we teach compassion with our art?












Your Thoughts






  1. As an artist do you feel you have a special responsibility to use your creativity to invent art projects that bring awareness of injustice and suffering?

  2. Have you ever sent art to your government representatives as a way to initiate action by them?

  3. Have you found any art projects in your neighborhood or country which focus on poverty and on providing solutions to hunger, housing, and support for the disenfranchised?

  4. Do you feel in your heart of hearts that the haves and the have-nots will one day recognize each other as one family?









deviantID

techgnotic
Art is long, life is short, judgement difficult, opportunity transient. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
United States
Current Residence: A Peaceful State
deviantWEAR sizing preference: L
Print preference: As Big As Possible.
Favourite genre of music: Rock. Jazz(Hard Bop). Blues. 80's Metal. Tribal(Aboriginal thru Electronic). Classical.Troubado
Favourite photographer: Sebastio Salgado. Richard Mapplethorpe. Walker Evans. Weegee.
Favourite style of art: Post-impressionist. Abstract-expressionist. The New Digital Vanguard. Contemporary fantasy.
Operating System: OSX
MP3 player of choice: Shuffle
Shell of choice: Any Conch will do.
Wallpaper of choice: French Louis XIV Rococo Style
Skin of choice: Thick enough to persevere and thin enough to feel.
Interests

Journal History

Comments


Add a Comment:
 
:icontamasgaspar:
TamasGaspar Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2014  Professional
Though I don't know how I deserved it, but thank you very much for the premium membership Sir! :bow::bow::bow:
Reply
:iconfrancesca-carboni:
Francesca-Carboni Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
thanks so much for the fav <3 Meow-thank You 
Reply
:iconnfergason:
nfergason Featured By Owner Oct 1, 2014
Thanks for the Fave!
Reply
:iconrichard67915:
Richard67915 Featured By Owner Sep 28, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks for the fave!!
Reply
:iconaussiedidge:
AussieDidge Featured By Owner Sep 19, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for the favourite on my journal piece. I did really enjoy your tribute to Robin Williams, and it was a great showcase of art from the people involved.

He shall be remembered for many generations to come.

Take care! :)
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:iconraynnergil:
raynnerGIL Featured By Owner Sep 12, 2014  Professional Interface Designer
thank you very much for premium member!!! :D any help, let me know
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:iconscheinbar:
scheinbar Featured By Owner Sep 9, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
:sun: thanks so much :sun:
:sun::sun::sun::sun::sun:
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:iconcali-purp:
Cali-Purp Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The best things in life are felt not touched.
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:icondamaimikaz:
DamaiMikaz Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks for adding Public image to your collections. I'm happy that you like it :la:
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:icontechgnotic:
techgnotic Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2014
You're welcome. Love reading through the conversation that you have ignited.
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:iconbluesodamania:
BluesodaMania Featured By Owner Sep 1, 2014  Student Filmographer
Amazing tribute to Robin Williams. I'll miss him too.
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bmb2000ca Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I love your Robert Williams tribute. It's a very nice obituary.
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:iconlonesomemusicnote:
LonesomeMusicNote Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
I enjoy your tribute to Robin. I am very saddened by his passing. I even made a tribute to him myself. Thank you for respecting such a great man.
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:icontraciewayling:
traciewayling Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
I did one for Robin, too.  Robin Williams inspired me in so many ways and on so many levels over the years. I was personally heartbroken when I heard the news of his death. He will be missed, and he will never be forgotten. If the one good thing to come from this is his ability to continue to highlight causes, all that it is to be human and all that needs to be understood, then maybe he has done all that he set out to do. RIP Robin, for whatever the reason it was your time, and maybe, just maybe a shed load more lives will have been saved as a result of this final twist of your own life story <3

traciewayling.deviantart.com/a…
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:iconqeva:
qeva Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
may we be friends?
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