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Introducing depthRADIUS

Logo design by Mario Luevanos
Film and animation by Scott Pagan


About depthRADIUS


depthRADIUS is named after the deviantART community that it reflects and represents. Built in service of the largest and most influential community of culture creators and culture responders in the world, this on-line journal explores the depths of the arts world from fine art to the most eminently accessible community arts projects. depthRADIUS endeavors to connect artists and art enthusiasts with other artists and art appreciators from all levels of the arts community, from its most successful stars and innovators to beginners just learning their crafts. The “radius” of this journalistic conversation will extend in its boundaries into arts advocacy, cultural relevancy, education and appreciation.

A Few Recent Journals



“We are all listening to each other.”

:icondepthradius:



You owe reality nothing and the truth about your feelings everything. — Richard Hugo 

82%
883 deviants said True - Please advise.
18%
196 deviants said False - Please advise.

Epiousios

Art

the artist acts like a mediumistic being who, from the labyrinth beyond time and space, seeks his way out to a clearing.

-Marcel Duchamp

Burns Brighter

I want a trouble-maker for a lover,
Blood spiller, blood drinker, a heart of flame,
Who quarrels with the sky and fights with fate,
Who burns like fire on the rushing sea.

From Rumi’s Kolliyaat-e Shams-e Tabrizi

True

Among those whom I like or admire, I can find no common denominator, but among those whom I love, I can: all of them make me laugh.
--W. H. Auden

Do You Realize? by The Flaming Lips -- Lyrics

Do You Realize - that you have the most beautiful face
Do You Realize - we're floating in space
Do You Realize - that happiness makes you cry
Do You Realize - that everyone you know someday will die

And instead of saying all of your goodbyes - let them know
You realize that life goes fast
It's hard to make the good things last
You realize the sun doesn't go down
It's just an illusion caused by the world spinning round

Do You Realize - that you have the most beautiful face

By The Way...

The best things in life are not things.

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Activity


Collection: The Allure of a Red Dress

Mon Dec 22, 2014, 12:20 PM
54-img-00 by techgnotic








Maybe it’s being the color of blood that makes red such a strong color, especially when displayed in public. It is exotic–a matador’s cape, or a vampire’s, or a flamenco dancer’s skirts. Most women have their “little black dress” for evening’s out. Black tells no secrets. It’s on the occasion of the “red dress” that we suddenly wonder what’s on the someone’s mind.


The message of “red” in novels, films and music is passion barely controlled, of sexual temptation. It is a flashing warning light. Plastic surgery made John Dillinger invisible to the FBI. It was the “Woman in Red” who betrayed him, by taking his arm as they exited a movie theater. He was gunned down in the alley. Ladies dipped their skirts into the pool of his red blood for mementos of the exciting night.









Collection: The Allure of a Red Dress

Maybe it’s being the color of blood that makes red such a strong color, especially when displayed in public. It is exotic—a matador’s cape, or a vampire’s, or a flamenco dancer’s skirts. Most young women have their “little black dress” for evening’s out. Black tells no secrets. It’s on the occasion of the “red dress” that we suddenly wonder what’s on the lady’s mind. The message of “red” is passion barely controlled, of sexual temptation. It is a flashing warning light. Plastic surgery made John Dillinger invisible to the FBI. It was the “Woman in Red” who betrayed him, by taking his arm as they exited a movie theater. He was gunned down in the alley. Ladies dipped their skirts into the pool of his red blood for mementos of the exciting night.


For more articles like this, visit depthRADIUS.
Want to submit any ideas, suggestions, collections, or an existing work for consideration for the Today page? We'd love to look at it. Email us at share@deviantart.com

Loading...
Untitled-1 by techgnotic











Forewordby techgnotic






Please welcome J.R.R. Tolkien expert and TheOneRing.net co-founder Cliff Broadway (aka theoneringnet) as he shares his take on the man behind the beloved series of books. Cliff helped build The One Ring.net, a fan-based site created and run by volunteers from around the world and the largest web portal for a single fandom, after working for Sir Ian McKellen(Gandalf) on his website. He has been traveling to New Zealand to cover both the original Lord Of The Rings trilogy and the new The Hobbit trilogy and has also been representing the site at San Diego Comic-Con to standing room only packed halls for 15 years straight.

It is only fitting that now that the last of The Hobbit films are out we take a moment to focus on the man behind the words, J. R. R. Tolkien.











By Cliff Broadway (aka theoneringnet)


To have an appreciation of the wondrous works of J.R.R. Tolkien you'll find no better place to start than the word Philology.



It cannot be used only to refer to academic-types who I imagine stuffed up in an ancient library filled with leathery old volumes and yellowed pages of long-dead Latin or somesuch. Such a dismissive idea doesn't do justice to what philology is really all about. The dictionary definition means: the study of language in written historical sources (the older the better); a combination of history, linguistics and literary criticism. Imagine the mighty blending of these things in one intellect—such that a person so perceptive would know words better than the author who was using them; tracing them back to ancient times long before modern use would accept them as genuine words at all. It's kind of fascinating, really.



Tolkien, or as he is referred to by hardcore fans, "the Professor," was a master of pursuing the history and ultimate genesis of all things that come out of English-speaking mouths. Every word has a source, and Ronald Tolkien knew them. Better than that, he could tell you the hidden meanings behind vowel sounds placed against certain consonants; and after illuminating all that he would want to spin a delightful imagined tale around the music of the words themselves. He was just that kind of mind.


He didn't know that he would become a noted philologist or the creator of a beloved series of books that featured Hobbits, Elves, Dwarves, Men, Wizards, and great Dragons, leaving a huge imprint on the world at large; but his mother Mabel Tolkien surely knew his gifts were strong when he was a wee lad. Wind the clock back to 1894. Mabel has moved her two young boys, Ronald (only age 4) and younger Hilary away from their birthplace of South Africa and back to good old England, over concerns the harsh climate would not be suitable for them. Even at this age, young Tolkien can fully read beyond his level. Mabel took notice of how fast he digested books and was thrilled he learned rudimentary Latin at that tender age. He generally took a strong fascination in learning, reciting, and absorbing words. She taught him some French, but he didn't like it as much - for no other reason than he disliked the sounds, the phonetics of it. His biographer Humphrey Carpenter tells us that Tolkien, as a child, was affected with the love of words, "as interested in the sounds and shapes of the words as in their meanings, and [his mother] began to realize that he had a special aptitude for language." Most other boys that age are interested in frogs and building forts in the woods. Ronald wanted to invent imaginary secret languages with his cousin. Tellingly, our young creator of Middle-earth-yet-to-come was more fascinated by the Welsh words written on the sides of train cars passing by: Nantyglo, Penrhiwceiber, and Senghenydd. You never know where a young intellect will lean when it is nourished early on.



Later moved to the scenic greenery of the Sarehole township, the boy's mind was filled with local color of a very British Midlands type. He walked past Shire-like hills and meadows that he saw blighted with black buildings and mills and brick edifices solidly appearing in the sky (such as Perrott's Folly and Edgbaston Waterworks, the original Two Towers). This contrast in landscape and witnessing the encroachment of industry would become fertile stuff in his mind for future stories. Figure in the fact his favorite books included George MacDonald's "Curdie" series of books "which were set in a remote kingdom where misshapen and malevolent goblins lurked beneath the mountains," the Arthurian legends, and most of all the "Red Fairy Book" by Andrew Lang. In the back pages Tolkien found the tale of Sigurd and how he slew the mighty dragon Fafnir: "a strange and powerful tale set in the nameless North." He was a child so moved by his imagination that the effort to create his own dragons came immediately. His mother heard him recite a story once and corrected his grammar, explaining: "One could not say 'a green great dragon,' but had to say 'a great green dragon.'" This stuck in his head and Tolkien admits he did not try to write another childhood story for many years after, but instead "was taken up with language."











Remember that bit about the English words "cellar door" being the most "beautiful" of our entire language?


That came from early references by Tolkien and others, making a cultural linguistic statement, about the phonaesthetics of our own speech. Much later in life the Professor would say: "Most English-speaking people... will admit that cellar door is 'beautiful,' especially if dissociated from its sense (and from its spelling). More beautiful than, say, sky, and far more beautiful than beautiful." And much later he would add:



Supposing you say some quite ordinary words to me, ‘cellar door,’ say... From that, I might think of a name ‘Selador,’ and from that a character, a situation begins to grow.”



This is the main insight we have into Tolkien's creative process. Words equal music. Form and function of such words matter much less than the melody they make when strung together. In 1900 Tolkien went to King Edwards School and fell under the tutelage of a brilliant and well known classical professor who encouraged him to pursue studies in ancient Greek and Latin. His headmaster had the foresight to show Tolkien copy of BEOWULF. The direction Tolkien later took when he advanced on a scholarship to Oxford was towards Anglo-Saxon (what would develop into English), Old Gothic German stories and the gob-smacking influence of the Finnish epic KALEVALA, and certainly the Icelandic EDDAS. The great poetry of the past was a treasure trove of phonetic glory, Tolkien's greatest playground of discovery. By 1915 he had achieved a degree of complexity in a new language he created as "a mad hobby." Thus were forged the first bits of Sindarin, his language for a majestic race (that would become the Noldor—the Elves) complete with his own alphabet system. Finnish was the strongest influence on this graceful word-craft. There was Quenya, too, the "high Latin" version of Elvish.



As we now know, Tolkien had been inventing these languages based on the music of words, as he investigated the traces of Welsh and Middle English, yet there was no geographic world in which this tongue could be spoken. Not yet, anyway. As Carpenter so adroitly says in Tolkien's official biography:



The more he worked on it the more he felt that it needed a 'history' to support it. In other words, you cannot have a language without a race of people to speak it. He was perfecting the language; now he had to decide to whom it belonged."



World War I nearly destroyed Tolkien—it certainly killed all of his close friends.


It was one thing to pursue his boyish bookworm passions, it was another to dodge mustard gas bombs that the Germans were sending over his head in the Battle of the Somme. Tolkien remained uninjured while so many died around him. Trench fever was what saved our young scholar in the end. Tolkien was granted medical leave from the battlefields of France. While healing in hospital back in England, his new bride, Edith Bratt, would sit at his bedside and listen to his first verses mentioning a place in his later masterpiece, "Gondolin," and a central character, "Eärendil the Mariner," who carries a star across the sky. A full career was awaiting him in Oxford back home (actually starting at Leeds) and his mind was swimming with linguistic possibilities, his ebullient love of stories well-told, and the spectre of warfare. This combination would drive Tolkien to create a mythological world, out of pure instinct, where all these factors would congeal into a new literary sub-creation. This effort would become his life-long spinning of a grand story, perhaps the greatest yarn of the 20th century.












I, among many Ringer fans, often wonder what it was like for Tolkien as he sat down to pen "The Hobbit" or "The Lord of the Rings."


His grasp of myth and its essential elements was keen yet it seems the impetus for his undertaking was not deliberate. Tolkien himself makes it sound as if his creative process was uniformly unguided, unforeseen, and free-flowing. He was an accidental tourist in Middle-earth, just as wide-eyed at its discovery as any reader first exploring the green lands of Eriador and the windswept Wilderlands. But it dawned upon him: this was an ideal place within which to set his Sindarin-speaking immortal beings, the Elves, and those most earthy of adventurers, Hobbits.



The opening salvo that started it all is in Bartlett's Familiar Quotations right alongside Churchill, Ghandi, and Jesus. The oft-quoted story about how this came about is found in Tolkien's published "Letters" No. 163, to W.H. Auden:



All I remember about the start of "The Hobbit" is sitting correcting School Certificate papers in the everlasting weariness of that annual task force on impecunious academics with children. On a blank leaf I scrawled: 'In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.' I did not and do not know why. I did nothing about it, for a long time, and for some years I got no further than the production of Thror's Map.”



You've seen that Map as an important illustration or color fold-out in every edition of the book since it was first published.  In his Biography Tolkien says his most casual approach to producing a first draft allowed his mind to wander:



Names always generate a story in my mind; eventually I thought I'd better find out what hobbits were like ... Later on ... I thought this was just too good to leave just on the back of an examination [paper]... I wrote the first chapter first -- then I forgot about it, then I wrote another part. I myself can still see the gaps... I really didn't know how to go on ... I just spun a yarn out of any elements in my head: I don't remember organizing the thing at all.”



And this most revealing comment from his Letters:



Always I had the sense of recording what was already ‘there,’ somewhere; not of ‘inventing.’”













He was glad to not feel rushed by any deadline, self-imposed or otherwise. His mind, the very mind that concocted a Selador out of melodious everyday words, was weaving languages and mythical histories side by side into this nascent Middle-earth. Tolkien had four children, with whom he sat and told rousing bedtime stories featuring the hobbit Bilbo Baggins, and thus had a chance to devise wild tangents and improvised episodes. He was figuring out what worked (and what didn't) with the story he so innocently started. Tolkien assumed the role of a storyteller Bard-On-A-Test-Drive. He was also famous for delivering Beowulf lectures at Oxford with a booming voice and flair.



Funny as it may seem when looking back to 1937, but the Professor certainly could not know his "Hobbit" would be the ideal place to set a future 1200-page epic saga—he had no clue any such demand for his work would arise. But the Dwarves, Elves, Men, and dark Enemies of his earliest poetry and wanderings in linguistics, the preoccupations of his teens and early 20's, would be ideally fit in Bilbo's new universe. So he grafted them together. He admits in Letter No. 163: "I did not know as I began it that it belonged. But it proved to be the discovery of the completion of the whole... As the high Legends of the beginning are supposed to look at things through Elvish minds, so the middle tale of the Hobbit takes a virtually human point of view—and the last tale blends them."


Supported by a mighty clique of writers and essayists (many within the academic world as Tolkien was), our fearless Professor shared his draft manuscripts with those calling themselves The Inklings. The very familiar C.S. Lewis ("Chronicles of Narnia") was among them, also being Tolkien's closest friend and literary ally; and also Warnie Lewis, R.E. Howard, and the famous novelist Charles Williams (who also worked for the Oxford newspaper). Nestled within their favorite local pub, the Eagle & Child, theirs was a merry gathering similar nearly every night where they could trade barbs and scholarly laughter over what the others were writing. Still considered the best writer's support circle of all time, this Entmoot of linguistic pros and flourishing writers was the absolute best place for Tolkien to find support.



I am continually surprised at this idea of Tolkien being a mere pilgrim in a lone-land; the quiet observer of an unfolding world; albeit one with the greatest cranium power I've ever known among writers of speculative fiction.


Every place, every history, river, creature and family name Tolkien invented in his lifelong pursuit of glossopoeia, the invention of languages, was fueled with resonance and ancient meaning. Each term was smartly placed to cast mood and color within his narrative. "Mordor," "Gil-Galad," "Rohirrim," "Sackville-Baggins"—all evocative words that provided their own stories as the languages advanced! His uncanny knowledge of the oldest roots of English (and the tragic heroic legends that we have remaining) informed his every invention. Tolkien wanted to wander in his imagination, loose and free, because it was the most satisfying place for his great passions to bear fruit. Tolkien's mind was the perfect storm of mythic aspirations and laboriously invented languages. He was untethered and happy to write down anything he discovered as the tale-telling progressed.



It took him upwards of 15 years to complete the manuscript for "The Lord of the Rings," the groundbreaking novel that would change the publishing world and irreversibly set a course for high Fantasy in the modern sphere.


That was how slowly and ponderously Tolkien labored over his work; and yet he would never stop going back to change and revise things when his imagination discovered another connection to his own internal linguistic forms.


J.R.R. Tolkien died in 1973 at the age of 81 with the mightiest and surely the most essential of his legends unfinished—"The Silmarillion." He was heartbroken that no publisher would take it, regardless of the smashing success of his later years with the "Rings" trilogy. It was a hulking symphony of mythical pre-history that grounded all of Middle-earth's poems and tales together with one cosmology, and not surprisingly it includes a creation myth based on music and harmonies among angelic beings. His love for sounds and language and songs were at the kernel of every pen-stroke he committed to paper. When it comes to hobbits, the philologist wins out over all.


Middle-earth was the great beneficiary of this man's learned passion. And we, of course, are the ongoing generations of readers still enthralled











Your Thoughts




  1. Have you read “The Hobbit” and the “Rings” trilogy?  What did (or did not) attract you to immersing yourself in Tolkien’s life-long labor of love?
  2. For “Rings” non-readers:  Did seeing any or all of the “Lord of the Rings” movies make you want to seek out and experience reading the original books?
  3. For “Rings” readers:  Did you think the movies were superior to the novels, or vice versa?  Or you do you think both are superior examples exemplifying the strengths of their separate, different media?
  4. Tolkien has been criticized for positing a world in which a really white race of good guys (Elves) must defend against the encroachments of dark-skinned bad guys (Orcs).  It has been suggested that Tolkien’s fiction betrayed his (perhaps entirely subconscious) affinity for the waning British Empire’s elitism, if not downright racism.  Is this a fair criticism?  Should storytellers always be sensitive to what unintended messages might be getting read into their tales?  Or is that a form of “self-censorship?”









Tolkien: An Accidental Tourist in His Own World
To have an appreciation of the wondrous works of J.R.R. Tolkien you'll find no better place to start than the word philology. It cannot be used only to refer to academic-types who i imagine stuffed up in an ancient library filled with leathery old volumes and yellowed pages of long-dead latin or somesuch. Such a dismissive idea doesn't do justice to what philology is really all about. The dictionary definition means: the study of language in written historical sources (the older the better); a combination of history, linguistics and literary criticism. Imagine the mighty blending of these things in one intellect—such that a person so perceptive would know words better than the author who was using them; tracing them back to ancient times long before modern use would accept them as genuine words at all. It's kind of fascinating, really.

For more articles like this, visit depthRADIUS.
Want to submit any ideas, suggestions, collections, or an existing work for consideration for the Today page? We'd love to look at it. Email us at share@deviantart.com
Loading...

Art Weapon For The People

Fri Dec 19, 2014, 6:33 PM
Phone by techgnotic








As you explore the possibilities just opened up to you by the DeviantArt Mobile App, you should all be asking more than just “how can this app entertain me,” but instead, how can this tool and the network of arts enthusiasts, fandoms, and creators that it represents, help me do my part to inspire and change the world?


You are now connected, we are now all connected, with DeviantArt wherever you are and whenever you want. Art is still humanity’s most powerful, magical and non-suppressible agent of change. Don’t believe the hype. You can make a difference. The arts, all of the arts, are one of the only means we have left to really do that.


As advertised, the DeviantArt Mobile App does indeed place the “world’s largest art gallery” in your hand. But the DeviantArt Mobile App is so much more than just a daily respite, a visit for a few minutes to an artistic oasis during a break time. It’s that of course, but let me be your witness to this app’s mind-blowing potentials.

















sharing aid, comfort, advice, tutoring, critiques and friendship. Through status updates, comments and, very soon, person to person messaging, what we have now been given in this mobile app is the ability to support any artist on DeviantArt with encouragement as well as the ability to ask a question, talk commissions—or find teams of artists for special projects. For the last couple of months, I’m probably on DeviantArt 10X more since having access to the app everywhere and anywhere I happen to be. I must report to you that the experience of being a part of this community, well, it just got exponentially, cosmically... deeper. Just wait until you download this thing and spend your first day “together” with it.


The ability to be responsive to events in our world in a creative way has been increased a thousand-fold with the power of the mobile app. The potentials for the future being opened up through this mobile app for our deviant storytellers (writers and poets needing artists, artists needing writers) are absolutely mindboggling. The increased reach and immediacy is even more impactful for curators, bloggers, culture fiends, publishers, producers and anyone in need of a creative jump start at any time of day in any place.

















When they were first implemented on the site I think the initial less than enthusiastic reaction of “What? Is this Facebook now and we post pictures of our food and the jacket we just bought?” was justified as a quick impression. Facebook is the defining point of reference online for a “Status Update.” But as soon as Status Updates launched on DeviantArt, this community started to change what they were. When I roll through Status Updates every morning on DA, what I find is a quick tip on drawing faces, an invitation to an Artgermination chatroom where you can improve your line art skills, a link to a new writer discovered just the night before, a wrap up to a community-sponsored challenge, a famous quotation paired with relevant pieces of artwork or a link to a newly curated collection that could change the way we think about art in any given category. This is a whole new way in to our ongoing conversation.


Being a part of this community for the better part of eight years, DeviantArt has always meant for me the creation, discussion and understanding of the world through a special art lens where, unlike anywhere else, there remains the ability to “speak” of our needs, concerns, hopes and dreams with great clarity and truth. The Arts have always been our great translator of truth beyond what mere words can express.




As the largest and most influential community of culture creators and culture responders in the world, we must cherish and make the best use of our grander visual and textual proposal as we artists and art appreciators continue on the ever-evolving arts journey we have chosen and that connects all our lives.
















  1. Do you consider yourself to have an “art lens” and can you make art out of anything that flies by in a day: a passing car, a tragic event unfolding in front of you, a simple gesture of thanks or love between people or animals?
  2. Living in public with a declaration of being an artist has just become easier. You now have the weapon. What statements will you hope to make?
  3. Are there places you go to just sit and browse art for inspiration? Do like quiet places or ones filled with people?
  4. Photographs can be art and art can be photographed. What art have you captured and shared on mobile and why? Give us link in the comments below.









Art Weapon For The People
The DeviantArt Mobile App is here! The information, resources—and pure pleasures—of everything that is DeviantArt are now available to you throughout your day, no farther away than your pocket. As advertised, our app does indeed place the “world’s largest art gallery” in the palm of your hand. But we also need to think about the far greater implications for all our futures and the future of the world inherent in the launch of our mobile arts app.
Loading...

Art Weapon For The People

Fri Dec 19, 2014, 6:33 PM
Phone by techgnotic








As you explore the possibilities just opened up to you by the DeviantArt Mobile App, you should all be asking more than just “how can this app entertain me,” but instead, how can this tool and the network of arts enthusiasts, fandoms, and creators that it represents, help me do my part to inspire and change the world?


You are now connected, we are now all connected, with DeviantArt wherever you are and whenever you want. Art is still humanity’s most powerful, magical and non-suppressible agent of change. Don’t believe the hype. You can make a difference. The arts, all of the arts, are one of the only means we have left to really do that.


As advertised, the DeviantArt Mobile App does indeed place the “world’s largest art gallery” in your hand. But the DeviantArt Mobile App is so much more than just a daily respite, a visit for a few minutes to an artistic oasis during a break time. It’s that of course, but let me be your witness to this app’s mind-blowing potentials.

















sharing aid, comfort, advice, tutoring, critiques and friendship. Through status updates, comments and, very soon, person to person messaging, what we have now been given in this mobile app is the ability to support any artist on DeviantArt with encouragement as well as the ability to ask a question, talk commissions—or find teams of artists for special projects. For the last couple of months, I’m probably on DeviantArt 10X more since having access to the app everywhere and anywhere I happen to be. I must report to you that the experience of being a part of this community, well, it just got exponentially, cosmically... deeper. Just wait until you download this thing and spend your first day “together” with it.


The ability to be responsive to events in our world in a creative way has been increased a thousand-fold with the power of the mobile app. The potentials for the future being opened up through this mobile app for our deviant storytellers (writers and poets needing artists, artists needing writers) are absolutely mindboggling. The increased reach and immediacy is even more impactful for curators, bloggers, culture fiends, publishers, producers and anyone in need of a creative jump start at any time of day in any place.

















When they were first implemented on the site I think the initial less than enthusiastic reaction of “What? Is this Facebook now and we post pictures of our food and the jacket we just bought?” was justified as a quick impression. Facebook is the defining point of reference online for a “Status Update.” But as soon as Status Updates launched on DeviantArt, this community started to change what they were. When I roll through Status Updates every morning on DA, what I find is a quick tip on drawing faces, an invitation to an Artgermination chatroom where you can improve your line art skills, a link to a new writer discovered just the night before, a wrap up to a community-sponsored challenge, a famous quotation paired with relevant pieces of artwork or a link to a newly curated collection that could change the way we think about art in any given category. This is a whole new way in to our ongoing conversation.


Being a part of this community for the better part of eight years, DeviantArt has always meant for me the creation, discussion and understanding of the world through a special art lens where, unlike anywhere else, there remains the ability to “speak” of our needs, concerns, hopes and dreams with great clarity and truth. The Arts have always been our great translator of truth beyond what mere words can express.




As the largest and most influential community of culture creators and culture responders in the world, we must cherish and make the best use of our grander visual and textual proposal as we artists and art appreciators continue on the ever-evolving arts journey we have chosen and that connects all our lives.
















  1. Do you consider yourself to have an “art lens” and can you make art out of anything that flies by in a day: a passing car, a tragic event unfolding in front of you, a simple gesture of thanks or love between people or animals?
  2. Living in public with a declaration of being an artist has just become easier. You now have the weapon. What statements will you hope to make?
  3. Are there places you go to just sit and browse art for inspiration? Do like quiet places or ones filled with people?
  4. Photographs can be art and art can be photographed. What art have you captured and shared on mobile and why? Give us link in the comments below.









deviantID

techgnotic
Art is long, life is short, judgement difficult, opportunity transient. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
United States
Current Residence: A Peaceful State
deviantWEAR sizing preference: L
Print preference: As Big As Possible.
Favourite genre of music: Rock. Jazz(Hard Bop). Blues. 80's Metal. Tribal(Aboriginal thru Electronic). Classical.Troubado
Favourite photographer: Sebastio Salgado. Richard Mapplethorpe. Walker Evans. Weegee.
Favourite style of art: Post-impressionist. Abstract-expressionist. The New Digital Vanguard. Contemporary fantasy.
Operating System: OSX
MP3 player of choice: Shuffle
Shell of choice: Any Conch will do.
Wallpaper of choice: French Louis XIV Rococo Style
Skin of choice: Thick enough to persevere and thin enough to feel.
Interests

Journal History

Comments


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:iconzicuta:
Zicuta Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Great collections photography and art, very inspiring.
I will be very happy if you feature my work, thanks

Greetings.
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:iconfirozart:
Firozart Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2014  Professional General Artist
Hmmm.... WHAT HAPPENED with the horoscope challenge????
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:icontechgnotic:
techgnotic Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2014
On it's way :)
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:iconelf-cat:
Elf-Cat Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2014  New member Hobbyist General Artist
I would like to report that marymary9090 is possibly a spam account.
Please keep an eye on this person, because spam type scams may occur again, as seen here contraltissimo.deviantart.com/… .
Reply
:iconfirozart:
Firozart Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2014  Professional General Artist
Hmmm, still nothing...regarding the horoscope challenge.

Just curious when it will be completed?
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:iconphoenixacezero:
phoenixacezero Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2014
Hey, are you running into any problem on stash writer?
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:iconemesalvatore:
emesalvatore Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2014
Hi, I wanted to ask if you could donate to me some points. 
Sorry for the inconvenience and thank you!
Reply
:iconinkyfan2342:
Inkyfan2342 Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2014  Student Artist
I said, Devart on that I want to help please let the points
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:iconthegirlwhofell2earth:
Your page is like a door to a thousand other doors... thanks for maintaining it ! (+Watches)
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:iconchigiri16:
Chigiri16 Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
YOU ARE FUCKING AWESOME
YOU HAVE BEEN WATCHED
Reply
:iconsera9000:
sera9000 Featured By Owner Oct 17, 2014  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Life is short, Art is eternal is a very true C:
Reply
:icontokysha:
Tokysha Featured By Owner Oct 12, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Hi!
The user "masdedi666" uses your icon (and also did some art theft).
I only wanted to tell you that. Thank you for reading~
Reply
:iconinkyfan2342:
Inkyfan2342 Featured By Owner Oct 12, 2014  Student Artist
give me premium
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:iconmarshmellow-girl:
Marshmellow-Girl Featured By Owner Edited Oct 9, 2014  Student Digital Artist
Umm.. someone stealing my and my friend's art and OCs

can you... plz... report him....?

here is a link to his account: ask-benjamin-drowned.deviantar…

thx, Marshmellow-Girl
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