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Star Wars: Battle Pod

Tue Mar 3, 2015, 4:23 PM
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“Star Wars: Battle Pod” has been released in arcades across America. An international release of the game is imminent.


The game is about the size of a moderately–large photo booth, and it weighs around 1,000 pounds. To enter, you open a small door and take a seat inside the compartment. In front of you rests an almost impossibly large curved screen, as well as the left– and right–hand controls. This is the type of chamber you may enter during daylight hours and exit only to find that it has become night.





by Bandai Namco


The game offers five simulations, all recreations of scenes and battles from the original films — Yavin, Hoth, Endor, The Death Star II — except for one. In the last mission, which is the most difficult, you play as Darth Vader in the wake of the rebel attack on the Death Star. Your object is to prevent the rebels from stealing the Death Star’s super laser, while piloting Vader’s TIE Advanced Fighter. If you’re a good shot, you get to kill Han Solo (George Lucas relented only after long resisting his heroes being killed in Star Wars games). If you’re a good gamer in general, write in and tell us what happens if you complete the mission — this reviewer failed to do so on an embarrassing number of occasions.







by Bandai Namco







by Bandai Namco















by Bandai Namco







The actual controls of the game are intuitive and fun.


You aren’t so much piloting the crafts in the missions as much as piloting the weapons and choosing to go fast or slow. Just for fun, during one flight I alternated sporadically between accelerating and braking and, frankly, couldn’t perceive much of a difference. Odds are you could leave the thrust control alone the entire game and not have a significantly different experience. But otherwise the developers have done a great job of making the game feel like the inside of a cockpit. The immersive nature of the contraption combined with the huge display, vibration, and surround-sound all add to this experience. There is also a wind effect — some sort of fan that blows harder or softer on your face depending, ostensibly, on how fast you’re going. For better or worse, it reminded this reviewer of the built-in fans on modern exercise bikes at the gym.







by Bandai Namco







by Bandai Namco












by Bandai Namco







What the game does not include are any scenarios from Star Wars Episodes I-III, which seems somewhat strange given the platform's potential for podracing levels. The developers have hinted that new levels could be added in the future, but haven’t given any indication of if or when these would be released.


Meanwhile rumors have surfaced recently that the new Star Wars: Battlefront game, which will possibly be released this coming winter, will feature battle sequences from the upcoming film The Force Awakens. Additionally, it seems that some characters from the new film will be playable in the game. Otherwise, it’s being hinted that the vast majority of the game’s levels will be derived from the era of the original film trilogy. A few battles from the prequels will be included as well, but the developers seem to be emphasizing the classic films especially, if the rumors are to be believed.





by Bandai Namco


It is worth noting that both Battle Pod and Battlefront are going light on prequel references.


It’s conceivable that this was a calculated move in anticipation of the upcoming film. While Episodes I, II, and III were not extremely well-received, the original trilogy is what drew multiple generations of Star Wars fans to the franchise to begin with. With that in mind, it stands to reason that developers across platforms would prefer to reignite the flames of fandom for the classics, and avoid referencing the prequels altogether.


Either way, Battle Pod is worth a play for any Star Wars fan, Battlefront looks enticing, and we are on the verge of peeing our pants with excitement for The Force Awakens.















Your Thoughts


  1. Would you like more events from the prequels to be used as backgrounds for the games, or do you prefer everything to be centered on the classic originals?
  2. Of all the Star Wars video games out there, which one provided you with the most immersive and authentic experience in your desire to be transported into the Star Wars universe?
  3. Do you think the arcade games should be transformed into “rides” with an emphasis on mind–blowing special effects, as opposed to simply being the games played in a booth rather than on your computer?












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There seem to be quite a lot of discrepancies in determining the actual date of National Pancake Day.


Internet sources list it variously as February 25 or 26 or September 26. For Christians observing Lenten rituals, “Shrove Tuesday” (on February 17 this year) is “Pancake Day,” the day you gorge on before beginning your fast. The IHOP (International House of Pancakes) should be a determining authority, but their advertising can’t decide if it’s February 17 or March 3. But really, who cares? Every morning we should wake up to Pancake Day. Here’s a gallery to make your mouth water.
















My absolute favorite meal in Nashville is sweet–potato pancakes at Pancake Pantry.”


— Taylor Swift










As is always the way with pancakes, the first hotcake to come out of the pan will probably be a bit misshapen. Just scoff it, and carry on with the rest.”


— Yotam Ottolenghi










When I get the chance to make my favorite breakfast on the weekend, I often choose to make pancakes.”


— Marcus Samuelsson










The laziest man I ever met put popcorn in his pancakes so they would turn over by themselves.”


— W. C. Fields
















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The Cure for Art Block


If you’re stalled out on your current project or just out of ideas, look no further than Art Block Blaster, right here on DeviantArt. This is the first issue and it features tutorials for writing, photography, and all sorts of other mediums.









Book Club


Need an excuse to do some more reading? CRLiterature has announced American Born Chinese as this month’s selection for their book club. American Born Chinese is a graphic novel by Gene Luen Yang, and you can find out where to get it as well as information about the book club schedule here.









Things They Don’t Teach in School: Poetic Life Instruction


Khaimin has set a lesson everyone can benefit from to verse: five things they don’t teach you in high school. Give it a read and see if it rings true for you.









Forum Threads


Are you posting in forum threads? Here’s one where you can get feedback on your photos. Keep calm and post on.








Happy Birthday Skottie Young


It’s Marvel comic artist skottieyoung’s birthday! Go by his profile and wish him well.








Catwoman Has a 10th Life


Issue #39 of Catwoman makes canon something that you may have already suspected: Catwoman is bisexual. Series writer Genevieve Valentine said in her blog: “this wasn’t a revelation so much as a confirmation.”








Orphan Black Season 3


If you’re not familiar with the series, the trailer for season three of Orphan Black may raise more questions than it answers. We recommend getting caught up on seasons one and two before the new season’s April 18 air date.








Arkham Knight


Last week we got a new trailer for Arkham Knight, which will be released June 2. How excited are you for this? We’ll be publishing a more in-depth look at the game soon.








Reddit + Wired


Reddit and Wired are teaming up to produce an original series about people and their technology called Cyborg Nation. According to the project’s director, Elizabeth Orne, the series will attempt to answer a relatively lofty question: "what is the future of human evolution?” We look forward to finding out more.








Björk at MoMA


A retrospective of Icelandic artist Björk’s work will open at the Museum of Modern Art in New York this weekend. To preview the show, a small army of 3-D mannequin copies of Björk have been set up on the museum’s third floor. If that’s a sign of what’s to come, we’d recommend checking this out.








#DearMe: Women Advise Their Younger Selves


In celebration of International Women’s Day, the #DearMe campaign is encouraging you to give your younger self some advice. Check out some people who’ve already made videos here, and then make your own!








Excellence In Chillology


Astralseeds is a new chatroom created by astralseed herself. It’s everything you could hope for in a chat and You need to be there!























The Stock Market - No. 13

Mon Mar 2, 2015, 5:50 PM
Img-og by techgnotic






The inspirational magic of one image awakening the creative muse of hundreds of artists.








This issue’s stock image



















You May Also Like


















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Was 1979 the most glorious year in world history?


I will give you three compelling arguments for why the answer is yes. For starters, it inspired the best pop–rock song about coming of age ever recorded: The Smashing Pumpkins’s 1979. Second, it is the year that gave us two groundbreaking developments in sci–fi filmmaking: Ridley Scott’s genre–defining Alien, and the birth of contemporary sci–fi director Neil Blomkamp (whose work includes District 9 and Elysium).


The stars are aligning, it seems, following a recent announcement that Blomkamp will be directing an upcoming Alien sequel. So if 1979 wasn’t the best year of all time, we can at least agree that it’s a weird coincidence.



Blomkamp has had a meteoric rise since his feature–length directoral debut in 2009. District 9 earned Blomkamp an Academy Award nod for best adapted screenplay, and the film itself was also nominated for best picture.


Since then he’s directed Elysium, Chappie, and now begins work on his Alien project. Blomkamp released concept art related to the Alien project earlier this year via Instragram, indicating that the project was not actually moving forward. The art Blomkamp posted included his own sketches, as well as concept art by djahal (Geoffroy Thoorens), who seems to have been working in conjunction with Blomkamp.


Sigourney Weaver has said publicly that she was interested in working with Blomkamp on an Alien sequel. Weaver’s involvement was recently confirmed, while Blomkamp has begun revealing details about the project. Namely, that his film will essentially ignore the plot of Alien 3 and Alien: Resurrection. This comes as welcome news to many of the franchise’s fans, as those two films are generally considered weaker than their predecessors.



An interesting aspect of Blomkamp’s career up until now is how much of his work has been derivative of his early short films. District 9 was adapted from a previous project he directed, called Alive in Joburg. Meanwhile Chappie, which hits theaters in early March, is loosely based on another of Blomkamp’s shorts entitled Tetra Vaal.












Despite being a relatively young director, Blomkamp’s signature style is all but trademarked in sci–fi film.


He is well–known for combining impoverished, barren–looking landscapes with sophisticated CGI. He also tends to shoot like a cinema verité filmmaker, using handheld rigs to provide an over the shoulder perspective. His narratives tend to be thematically concerned with poverty and class struggles. More than anything, Blomkamp has a penchant for including sentient robots in his films, both feature–length and short.


Robots who catch feelings aren’t exactly fresh territory for sci–fi, but you can’t disagree that Blomkamp’s films provide some of the most interesting insights on the topic. Blomkamp likes rebellious, rakish protagonists and seems very interested in interactions between humans and robots. His short film Tempbot is a hyper focused look at the breakdown of communication between humans and androids, and that theme permeates all of his feature work as well. If the trailer is any indication, Chappie is poised to explore these barriers on an even deeper level.


We can’t wait to find out where it goes, and we’ll be eagerly awaiting any and all updates on his Alien project, which looks to be the next shining star in the complicated, beautiful constellation coming into formation that is Neil Blomkamp’s career thus far.















Your Thoughts


  1. District 9 is one of just a handful of sci-fi films ever to be nominated for Best Picture. What are some of your sci-fi favorites that you think should have been worthy of Oscar nominations?
  2. If androids become commonplace in the future, do you believe their emotions should be subject to regulation? Or will it be impossible to control rebel programmers?
  3. Are you familiar with the concept of Singularity? Do you think that one day artificial intelligence will match and then surpass human intelligence levels?












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HBO Writing Program


If you’re looking to make the transition from amateur scribbler to enormously successful screenwriter in a single bound, HBO might be able to help out. The always-innovative network announced last week that it would begin accepting applications for its brand new fellowship program as of March 4. Those accepted will attend one week of master classes in Santa Monica, and then begin an eight-month partnership with an HBO development exec through which they will learn about script development. The program culminates with a reception and reading where fellows will meet members of the entertainment industry. Why are you still reading this? Get to work on that application!







Chappie


Neil Blomkamp’s new film Chappie will be released in theaters this week. If you’re like us, you’re probably already salivating over Blomkamp’s upcoming Alien project, but Chappie, which looks very good in its own right, should at least give us all something to nibble on while we wait. Check back soon for our article profiling Blomkamp’s career up to this point, as well as a look at his upcoming projects.







Ceres Lights


There are some strange lights coming from a dwarf planet called Ceres in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, NASA scientists discovered last week. NASA’s Dawn spacecraft relayed an image of the planet’s surface with what appear to be two large, bright spots, one slightly dimmer than the other. While some scientists are speculating that volcanic activity beneath the planet’s surface could have caused the spots to form, we may not know until the Dawn enters into orbit around Ceres to take clearer photos. In the meantime, we’re secretly hoping it’s aliens.







Suicide Squad Update


Director David Ayer, who is at the helm of the upcoming film Suicide Squad, gave some details about the film away on Twitter over the weekend. Namely, when asked to describe The Joker, being played by Jared Leto, in one word, Ayer replied “Majestic.” What word comes to your mind when you think about Joker? We’re very intrigued by Ayer’s answer, in any case.











by popsci


Valve


Valve and HTC are coming together to create a virtual reality headset, which will release during this year’s holiday season. The VR headset, which is threatening to be the first to get a mass-market release, will be capable of motion tracking and presumably feature some of Valve’s premier content (fingers crossed for Half-Life).







New Museum


New York’s New Museum opened its 2015 Triennial, which is titled “Surround Audience” last week. Among the exhibition’s offerings are some Teletubbies in full SWAT gear, sort of an alternate-reality interpretation of Zucotti Park, as well as many other striking and provocative installations. If you’re in New York in the next several months, we recommend stopping by.








Account Deletion Rumor


Just so we’re clear, we won’t be deleting accounts on May 21. Not this year, not last year, not next year. You can help us put this rumor to bed and cease any unwarranted panic by sharing this post!







Cover Art Needed


Brian Quentin Webb (bQw) is looking for cover art for his long-form sci-fi project. Brian is an elementary school teacher in Taiwan, and you can read his call for submissions here.







Gamer For Life


A fan art tribute book which honors the life of game developer Kevin Kenai Griffith is being published through Indiegogo, and includes fan art from several deviants. Griffith passed away last fall after he was diagnosed with an extremely rare form of cancer. Proceeds from the project will go toward two non-profits, CureASPS and Game Changer, the former group researches the form of cancer that Griffith had, while Game Changer donates games and funds for medical treatment to children with cancer.







Photography Debate


An ongoing debate is taking place at CRPhotography that relates to lens focus. Specifically, whether it’s better to use auto-focus, or to focus the lens manually. if you have strong opinions on the topic or just want to learn more about it, head over and jump in.







Greystream Journal


If you’re lacking confidence or inspiration today, go read Greystream’s journal “Extraordinary,” and see if it doesn’t get some creative sparks flying.








Schwann’s Birthday


Today is futuristic samurai DJ Shwann’s birthday! Drop in and wish him a happy one.






















Collection: Strength

Mon Mar 2, 2015, 11:18 AM
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When “strength” is the topic, do you think of physical or machine power—or of will power and determination to achieve the goals of your cause?


Relative to size, no human being has ever been as powerful as a common ant. And one person’s life ambition is often another person’s conception of total madness. Context and perspective is everything — as you’ll find illustrated by perusing the following gallery of images of various artists’ ideas of “strength.”
















No one saves us but ourselves. No one can and no one may. We ourselves must walk the path.”


— Buddha










Strength does not come from winning. Your struggles develop your strengths. When you go through hardships and decide not to surrender, that is strength.”


— Arnold Schwarzenegger










Unity is strength…when there is teamwork and collaboration, wonderful things can be achieved.”


— Mattie Stepanek
















Project Porkchop Vol. 371

Mon Mar 2, 2015, 11:13 AM
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About Project Porkchop





The DeviantArt Experience can sometimes quickly become the quintessential example of that most frustrating problem: too much of a good thing. There just aren’t enough hours in the day to peruse the thousands of submissions and postings of artistic innovation, creativity and sheer beauty that are generated everyday.


So thank you for ProjectPorkchop!


Astralseed, an Icelandic deviant artist with a penchant for equines, including Quirlicorns (a breed of unicorns), has made our busy lives so much easier with ProjectPorkchop, a feature she started on her DeviantArt page. Project Porkchop’s fine eye for the best of the newly submitted artworks of virtually unknown artists, the incredible art that slips past us, unseen and denied its due, day after day, has meant so very much for these artists trying to create a presence in the art world, beginning on DeviantArt. By spotlighting these skilled artists  and connecting creative art and creative art lovers, this group is doing the arts universe an immeasurable service.
















About the Artist


Dave is a professional designs and interfaces artist from Canada. He is a brilliant digital painter and his works are predominantly fantasy and video game fan art. He blends his colors really beautifully and has a knack for realism. His gallery is quite extensive and you will enjoy browsing every single page of it!








View More of daveisblue’s Gallery















About the Artist


Brambora is a varied artist from the Czech Republic. She has a lot of variety to offer and her gallery includes traditional drawings, photography and even crochet work. Her drawings are in the pointalist style and are very nicely shaded and colored. Her crochet work is intricate and beautiful and her photos will please any cat lover!


















About the Artist


Aiste is an artisan crafter from Lithuania. She has had a lifelong love of crafting and as of late, has begun focussing on making Soutache jewelry. Her creations are nothing short of amazing! The intricate beadwork, the ornate wire wrapped stones and the stunning colors will make you fall instantly in love! If you are a jewelry lover, you must pay her page a visit… you will be glad you did!








View More of aistek’s Gallery















About the Artist


Herzlich is a photographer from Germany. She strives to find natural beauty everywhere from plants and animals to emotive portraiture. Her lighting is very soft and every piece has a feeling of romance, like visual poetry. She gets intimate with her subjects by focusing on tight close-up shots and close cropping giving her work a very personal touch. You will definitely want to add her to your watch list!








View More of herzlich-t’s Gallery















About the Artist


Alessandra is an artisan crafter from Italy. She creates beautiful and enchanting handmade cameo jewelry and stylish pendants. She is an expert at crafting small, fine details and incorporates dazzling decorative elements such as gemstones for an added special touch! She also sculpts adorable pendants out of clay that you must see to believe!















Spread the Word





If you enjoyed this article please be sure to :+fav: it, as this helps these artists get even more exposure. If you would like to suggest someone for a future ProjectPorkchop article please send a note to our group.


















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In a business of massive ego and terrible behavior directed at slicing and dicing their competition, Leonard Nimoy was known as a total gentleman, a class act all the way and a consummate professional at every turn.


For several generations around the globe he will be forever “Mr. Spock,” the half-human, half-Vulcan first officer of the U.S.S. Enterprise, a United Federation starship exploring distant galaxies on television’s cult phenomenon, Star Trek (1966–69). His first autobiography was, “I Am Not Spock” (1975) and his second, “I Am Spock” (1995). Leonard Nimoy, who died today February 27, 2015, was both Spock and artist and so much more. His multi-faceted life in the arts reflected the 1960s–era of radical cultural flux and personal self-discovery that changed America and the world.


Star Trek was created and produced in the mid-1960s by Gene Roddenberry who, as a U.S. Army Air Force pilot in WWII, survived the crash of a B-17E Flying Fortress and flew 89 combat missions, earning him the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal. Star Trek would be one of the last pop culture entertainments reflecting America’s post-WWII public presumption that American intervention, even military, was always unquestionably a force for good in foreign conflicts worldwide. American science & technology, “enterprise,” democracy and basic goodness were on the march to save the world. The Vietnam War and Watergate scandal would soon shatter this grand illusion.



Nimoy’s “Spock” alter ego on Star Trek was of mixed heritage.



His mother was a human. His father was a Vulcan. In the world of Star Trek, the original main “tribes” of players were the humanoid good guys of the United Federation of Planets. The Vulcans were an alien race who had managed to suppress all emotion from their psyches as a way to avert destructive violence. The Vulcans were usually allied with the Federation. The Romulans originated as a rebel group of Vulcans who rejected the suppression of emotions. They shared the same ultra-logical, ultra-intellectual mindset as the Vulcans, but they could be politically devious and often went in and out of alliance with the Federation in the struggle to defend the universe against the Klingons, the pure evil nemesis race. Spock’s half-human/half-Vulcan no-nonsense personality, only occasionally evincing emotion in a rare moment of concern for Captain Kirk or an even rarer smile, made for moments of wonderful comic relief. Spock became an international pop icon of the scientific explorer leading humanity into the future.












After Star Trek’s cancelation in 1969 and before its resurrection in syndicated reruns and sci-fi conventions, Nimoy became a regular on Mission: Impossible and appeared in numerous other television shows.



He also won acclaim for his roles on stage, including productions of Vincent, Fiddler on the Roof, The Man in the Glass Booth and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.


As an artist, Nimoy was not satisfied by only acting in only acting on television, in films and on stage, as well as directing other actors. He parlayed his fame as “Spock” into getting published as a poet and performing regular public readings of his poems. His final book of poetry, A Lifetime of Love: Poems on the Passages of Life, was published in 2002. Trekkies wanting to check out his poetry are encouraged to visit the online Contemporary Poets index of The HyperTexts. Nimoy’s poems are simple, accessible and mostly about moments in the experience of loving and being loved.




For Susan


people we love


and strangers too


are shedding tears


and walking


sad and dusty streets


your hand touches mine


and comforts me


love is the beginning


and the end



Nimoy’s life-long interest in photography manifested itself in two controversial coffee table edition publications of his portraiture.


Shekhina, published in 2005 is a celebration of Jewish femininity and sensuality — Nimoy’s intent being to cut across stereotypes of “cold” Jewish women. Defenders of the faith seemed to be more offended by Nimoy’s acceptance of “Shekhina” as a legitimate goddess in the Jewish pantheon than by the nudity in most the photos. The Full Body Project (2007) took Nimoy’s objective of redefining female beauty to a new level with a series of portraits of full-figure females in classic nude poses.









Spock Lives! The Second Coming. (1979)


After its cancellation, Roddenberry continued to lobby Paramount for a revival of Star Trek as a feature film, pointing to the reruns’ success in worldwide syndication and then the Star Wars sensation in 1977. The success of Close Encounters of the Third Kind finally got Paramount to relent. Star Trek: The Motion Picture was a moderate success but suffered from a script that was a couple notches too “hard sci-fi” in plotting, dealing with an Earth-launched space probe that achieves full A.I. sentience. It seeks to return to its Earthly creator (as humans yearn to reunite with God?), and is killing everybody who gets in the way of this reunion. Nevertheless, the film did well enough to get a second one greenlighted – and Leonard Nimoy would return as Spock on the big screen in the six Star Trek sequels that featured the original TV series characters. Nimoy would direct two of these sequels as well.



Spock Lives! The Third Coming. (2009)


When Paramount decided to “reboot” their Star Trek film franchise with new actors replacing the TV series’ iconic players, there was great trepidation about fan response. But J.J. Abrams managed to work his magic in capturing the tenor and excitement of the original shows – and the ghostly cameo of Leonard Nimoy as “Spock Prime” sealed the deal with fans, who gave their fulsome approval to the relaunch. The sequel, 2013’s Star Trek Into Darkness, would again feature a “Spock Prime” cameo – and be Leonard Nimoy’s final appearance in a film.


Leonard Nimoy was an actor who never stopped pursuing other forms of artistic expression, most of which he had some success with. His singing career was ridiculed by critics and fans alike, but he persisted in trying, anyway. In the space of two decades between volumes of autobiography, he was forced to reconcile himself to his persona being, in fact, part “Spock,” forever, whether he liked it or not. The poet in him finally accepted and embraced the proposition.


He was a talented actor, director and photographer. He was an artist’s artist.



I have worn more masks than I can remember


I have been a face without a name


And when like you I ask the final question


Who on earth am I supposed to be


I always come full circle to the answer, me, only me…always me



Leonard Nimoy


(1931-2015)


Live long and prosper.





















Fan Art Friday: Muppets

Fri Feb 27, 2015, 11:30 AM
Img-00a by techgnotic














The Muppets are celebrating their 60th birthday this year!


Jim Henson created the group of puppets back in 1955 for his first TV show, called “Sam and Friends.” Henson said the term Muppet had emerged from a combination of “marionette” and “puppet.” Henson’s wildly imagined collection of characters has been delighting children and adults with their absurd antics and comedic sketches ever since.


Muppets are not born in a day. They are carefully created through an extensive and creative process. Once the molding of the Muppet is complete, the real work begins. The puppeteers or “Muppet performers” can take up to a year to develop their characters and voices. A Muppet may be passed around to different puppeteers until they find their “perfect human–Muppet match.” You may have noticed almost all the Muppets are left–handed. That’s because the puppeteers operate the head with their right hand and operate the arm rod with their left hand.



Here’s a couple more fun facts about the Muppets’ origins you may not know


Kermit the Frog started his life as a lizard and eventually his character evolved into a frog. Miss Piggy was based on the singer Peggy Lee. In 1979, Miss Piggy’s puppeteer Frank Oz opened up to the New York Times about her rough childhood. He stated “She grew up in a small town in Iowa; her father died when she was young, and her mother wasn’t that nice to her. She had to enter beauty contests to survive, as many single women do. She has a lot of vulnerability which she has to hide, because of her need to be a superstar.”


Other famous inspirations for the Muppets include The Who’s Keith Moon, whom Animal (the drummer) is based on, Elton John, who inspired Electric Mayhem leader Dr. Teeth, and even Mick Jagger’s lips, which served as the model for Electric Mayhem’s guitarist Janice. Dustin Hoffman’s character in “Midnight Cowboy” was the inspiration behind Rizzo the Rat.












Muppets “Statler” and “Waldorf” get their names from the New York City hotels The Statler Hilton (now the Hotel Pennsylvania) and the Waldorf–Astoria Hotel.



Fozzie the Bear was named after Fraz Fazakas, the puppeteer who helped create the system that allowed Fozzie to wiggle his ears. Rowlf the dog was originally created for a Purina Dog Chow commercial in 1962 and soon after rose to fame on The Jimmy Dean Show.


During his life Jim Henson created over 200 Muppets with several of those rising to celebrity like status. His other well–known Muppets have starred in Sesame Street and Fraggle Rock. While their creator is no longer with us, The Muppets will live on to bring joy to all who tune in for a Muppet show. It’s not easy waiting for the next Muppet installment so while you hold tight for their next adventure to be announced, enjoy this wonderful collection of Muppet fan art.













I don’t care what you think of me, unless you think I’m awesome. In which case you are right.”


— Miss Piggy










Here’s some simple advice: always be yourself. Never take yourself too seriously. And beware the advice from experts, pigs, and members of Parliament.”


— Kermit the Frog










It seems the words on my coffee mug are right: ‘It is hard to soar with Eagles when you work with turkeys’.”


— Sam the American Eagle










What should you do if someone gives you a large boulder as a present? Take it for granite! Wocka! Wocka!”


— Fozzie Bear










Oh, I tell ya, Camilla, great plumbers are born, not made! I’m the prince of plungers, fair maiden!”


— Gonzo










Well, how do you like the film?


I’ve seen detergents that leave a better film than this.”


— Statler and Waldorf












Your Thoughts


  1. Who is your favorite Muppets character and why?
  2. What would you like to see in future editions of Fan Art Friday?












Cosplay Friday: Legend of Korra

Fri Feb 27, 2015, 11:28 AM
Img-og by techgnotic














Before there was Katniss Everdeen there was Korra the Avatar


Fans sadly bid adieu to the The Legend of Korra series as its run on Nickelodeon came to a close this past December. A sequel to the popular Avatar: The Last Airbender, the series takes place 70 years after Avatar and follows 17 year old Korra as she tries to master the last element needed to become a full Avatar.


The Legend of Korra debuted in 2010 and pushed the boundaries of children’s television by featuring more mature topics touching on violence, race, sexual orientation, and politics.



In the show’s very first season a character was killed on screen in the season finale, leading to it being pulled from the Saturday morning lineup for being too dark.


Our lead character, Korra, is a strong, brave heroine of color — something still not all that common in film or television. And while the show doesn’t take place in our world, it still incorporates Eastern influences and ideas from other cultures.












In terms of sexual orientation, the kicker came at the end of the series


Spoiler Alert:


The once romantic rivals Korra and Asami, whose relationship had evolved over the course of the show, are shown holding hands in the exact same pose as Aang and Katara kissing at the end of The Last Airbender. While the showrunners didn’t go that far, it was clear that this pair was more than just friends — something no other children’s show has been as explicit about.



From a political side, through its storylines the show has tackled fascism via Kuvira and weapons of mass destruction via the Spirit Weapon, among other topics. Keeping with its Eastern influences, The Legend of Korra, while not mentioning religion, does foster the values of balance and mindfulness.


All of these are very serious topics for a child–oriented show and have definitely pushed the boundaries of where children's programing can go. The Legend of Korra ultimately taught us through Korra’s journey about embracing the sides of ourselves that are awkward and that we may not be comfortable with. The lesson is about self–acceptance.


While The Legend of Korra series may be over and the future of more Avatar series is still uncertain, we can still enjoy these beloved characters in the flesh. Cosplayers from around the world have joined their talents to bring the world of Avatar to life. So whether you’re a fire bender, water bender, earth bender, air bender or a full avatar, get ready to enjoy a gallery of Avatartastic cosplay.
















It’s all right. People usually assume that I’m daddy’s helpless little girl, but I can handle myself.”


— Asami










We are perfect for each other! She’s strong, I’m strong. She’s fun, I’m fun. She’s beautiful… I’m GORGEOUS!”


— Bolin










I’m impressed. No one has ever gotten the better of me like that. It is almost a shame to take the bending of someone so talented. ALMOST.”


— Amon










The key is to be like the leaf, flow… with the movement of the gates. Airbending is all about spiral movements. When you meet resistance, you must be able to switch directions at a moments notice.”


— Tenzin










Yeah, but I don’t know why. The other elements came so easily to me, but every single time I’ve tried Airbending [sticks out her tongue] nothing.”


— Korra










I’m happy to help any way I can. I want these Equalists to pay for what they’ve done.”


— Hiroshi Sato










And now for the grand tour! The Flying Bison sleeps in those caves down there. And that’s the temple grandpa Aang built. And that’s the green house that we grow the vegetables we eat.”


— Ikki












Your Thoughts


  1. Who is you favorite The Legend of Korra character and why?
  2. What would you like to see in future editions of Cosplay Friday?












Llamas on the Run

Thu Feb 26, 2015, 7:59 PM
Img-og by techgnotic















Llamas On The Run Update!


BECAUSE YOU DEMANDED IT!!


The Runaway Llamas badge is now official! Deviants who have received 25,000 or more Llama Badges have the ability to display the Runaway Llamas badge.



Llama on the Lam


They knew there would be no escaping the security measures of the Arizona “llama ranch” where they were incarcerated, spending their days growing out their woolen coats, greatly valued by hipster trendsetters. They received no benefit from their wool, expropriated with no recompense by their rancher overlords. They were allowed to live so long as the quality of their wool remained high. But there would be no stud farm retirement. Just a visit from the llama meat vendor.



So the break for freedom would have to happen at the weakest link in “llama control.”


The three comrades feigned illness to get loaded onto the trailer for a trip to the “animal therapist.” Nights had been spent sneaking into the barn to chew on the trailer door lock, weakening it enough to be busted open with a single mighty llama kick. At Third and Main, Bennie kicked open the door at a red light. He and Che then hit the asphalt running. But Larry froze with fear, cowering in the trailer. The plan was to follow the freeways after dark into Mexico, and then continue south, eventually hooking up with the L.R.M. (Llama Resistance Movement) in the mountains in Peru. It was not to be. Dozens of Llama Patrol special agents appeared and converged on the rebel runners.


Bennie and Che failed this day. But their cause lives on. Their few moments of freedom in the sun will long be recounted around llama campfires.