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A Tribute to Robin Williams

Fri Aug 22, 2014, 10:38 AM












Editor’s Note:


Why did we delay for more than a week the publishing of this remembrance? Because to properly reflect the impact of this loss on the millions of Robin Williams fans worldwide, we wanted to be sure to capture a true sense of the torrent of love for Robin pouring in from the community in the form of heartfelt portraits and other tribute art.






We chose the “best” pieces to accompany our own prose tribute, but the “best” kept being supplanted by “better bests.” There is no end to the river of love for Robin Williams and we expect no end to the fabulous tributes artists will pay to his work.













Why Robin Williams Was Important
(You already knew he was funny.)






The official obituaries are disappointing. Descriptions of his humor rely heavily on “you had to be there.” They are unable to use words to describe the manic madness that was a Robin Williams performance in full flight (improvisational probing of the uncaged and directionless zeitgeist of the youth of the times, 1978–80).





Robin Williams’ early work—zany stand–up comic then hitting big-time with prime time network sitcom—is followed by an appreciation of his skills as a comic actor in the Hollywood studio feature films that followed, the places where most of Robin Williams’ millions of fans worldwide came to know and love him: places like The World According to Garp (1982), Moscow-on-the-Hudson (1984), Good Morning Vietnam (1987), Dead Poets Society (1989), The Fisher King (1991), Mrs. Doubtfire (1993) and Good Will Hunting (1997). Robin Williams’ good–natured optimism and genuine love for humanity shined brightly on the big screen.


But to achieve such success in the movies meant disappearing the demonic anarchic spirit that animated Robin Williams’ early comedy club days—the very thing that electrified a lost and “stagflated” post-punk generation. Robin Williams in the movies was all of his wild energy minus any danger. He might have been the next Lenny Bruce, or even at least the next George Carlin, had his be-all, end-all work ethic not dictated that he accept roles in one studio picture after another, regardless of quality. His need to always be on, always pleasing people, resulted in so many of his movie roles being so insultingly far beneath the potentials of his true talents. Edgier projects never had a chance of organically evolving to emerge from his febrile imagination. He had to be constantly working instead of nurturing. It defined him.


Tragically, the same intense drive to always be working plus a ton of sudden wealth resulted in a cocaine addiction that took a serious toll on his health. He suffered through decades of rough divorces, of being on and off the rehab wagon, and a major heart surgery.


For those familiar with his career from his earliest stand–up days, this once whirling dervish’s gradual loss of comedic velocity was as painful to watch as it no doubt must have been for him to endure.  His final HBO special shows him to be just as funny as other HBO star stand-ups, the sadness being he was once pure genius, light-years ahead of the usual stuff. To see him falling back on bits of decades-old improv when new jokes died was a bit of irony the young Robin Williams would have savored and savaged.



The official chroniclers of our society tend to focus on “success” (especially financial) and how a person attained that success as the core narrative of an individual’s life. But very often a performer’s importance in influencing society lies not in being a role model over the lifetime of a successful career (e.g., the emphasis on how much money Robin Williams’ decades of movies made) but in some spark they provided to the inchoate consciousnesses of their audiences in the early days. The no-limits comedic freedom and anarchy represented by Robin Williams in his first few years on the stand-up scene may have been his lasting legacy, the TV and movies that followed reflecting a mere single facet of his talent, rather than a laboratory for honing his improvisational magic.


The word comes in that it was a Parkinson’s diagnosis that finally made Robin Williams fall to Earth. After having lived through his college roommate Christopher “Superman” Reeves’ quadriplegia and his friend John Belushi’s drug overdose death, this final cruel joke on him—this physical comedian extremis gradually losing half his language with his audience—was one cosmic irony he could finally find no humor in.


What will live on forever will be the pure unadulterated, sheer joy the mere sight of Robin Williams’ smiling face brought and will always bring to his fans. This joy is reflected back in an inundation of the deviantART website with over 5000 portraits and other “Robin-pieces” made and shared by the worldwide deviantART community of artists just since his passing. An evening at the movies with this man, even in his most formulaic “dramedies,” will always mean a psychic cleansing for the millions who love him, a receiving of this holy man’s gift of healing through laughter and his talent at transporting us to where we can indulge a return to our most childlike happiness.




But, wow, just remembering Robin Williams burning down the clubs in 1979—and imagining what could have been... Well, I guess you had to be there.




































Questions for The Reader






  1. Do you think Robin Williams could have remained a vital comedian and comic actor even as he battled Parkinson’s disease? Have you battled disease while pursuing your art?

  2. Do you think that all great artists possess hidden “darkness” of the heart or mind that adds a powerful poignancy to their work? The funnier the comic, the more intense the suppressed dark side?

  3. Are highly intelligent or very talented people better able to hide their misery from loved ones, thus making it all the harder to “read” them and help them?

  4. Do you think it’s possible for successful artists to fight the allure of the more exotic dangerous diversions, deal with chronic depression, deal with serious diseases, yet still continue to create art successfully? Is a strong community a key to avoiding these hazards?

  5. Almost every comedic interaction from Robin Williams produced an immediate sense of well–being for the audience. Are there works of visual art or literature that have this effect on you?



Suicide Prevention & Support


If you or someone close to you needs additional emotional or psychological support, please contact your local suicide prevention hotline.


If you reside within the U.S., please click here.


If you reside Internationally, please click here.











The official obituaries are disappointing. Descriptions of his humor rely heavily on “you had to be there.” They are unable to use words to describe the manic madness that was a Robin Williams performance in full flight (improvisational probing of the uncaged and directionless zeitgeist of the youth of the times, 1978–80).


Writers: techgnotic 
Designers: marioluevanos, seoul-child
Add a Comment:
 
:iconbudcharles:
BudCharles Featured By Owner 2 hours ago
Are highly intelligent or very talented people better able to hide their misery from loved ones, thus making it all the harder to “read” them and help them?

I don't think that's quite why. Academic and creative intelligence does not equal emotional intelligence, being a good artist or scientist doesn't make someone good at hiding emotions. I think the main reason smarter people are harder to help is they have a solid logical reason for being upset and it's impossible to convince them they should be happy.
Reply
:iconhiyoriinpiu:
Hiyoriinpiu Featured By Owner 1 day ago  New member Professional General Artist
Woa!! this tribute is perfect.
Reply
:icontheenderwolf:
TheEnderWolf Featured By Owner 1 day ago  New member Hobbyist Artist
Robin was the best comedian possible. Though none of us will ever be as good as him, I shall miss his jokes.
Reply
:iconselkie-gal:
selkie-gal Featured By Owner 3 days ago  Hobbyist General Artist
No matter what role he was playing, his acting was always so full of depth and completely sincere.

RIP Robin, I have not felt a sense of loss over a celebrity death like this since Steve Irwin's passing :( You will be greatly missed, and wherever you are now, I hope you have found peace from the demons you were fighting.
Reply
:iconhooon:
hooon Featured By Owner 5 days ago
The Bonus Features of "Aladdin: Diamond (in the rough) Edition" Blu-ray should have:
*Never had a friend like him - A Tribute to Robin Williams
Reply
:icon91vadpire:
91vadpire Featured By Owner 6 days ago  Student
they have been making genie art lately like 2,000 drawings per day :(
Reply
:iconaarowill13:
aarowill13 Featured By Owner Sep 10, 2014
what else can I use for media than just this
Remember Captain Robin ( Star ) 
Reply
:iconzekkentak:
Zekkentak Featured By Owner Sep 9, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
Usually I wouldn't really feel any emotions in the death of a celebrity, maybe shock,
but thats just about it.

But Robin was a completely different story, even typing this out I hold back my tears..
He was so incredibly unique, full of so much passion to express himself
and to love those that surround him that doesn't faze his morals. He expressed so much charisma that one
can only wonder how a human being can be so optimistic and caring for the world around him regardless of what was being thrown at him,
especially if they have such a strange and amazing sense of humour.

It is absolutely devestating.
He is completely irreplaceable and I will never forget
the joy he brought to me and my family in times where everything just seemed so low.

I miss him so much..
Reply
:iconzyl5:
ZYL5 Featured By Owner Edited Sep 8, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I did not know that this guy was Disney!Aladdin Genie's actor.

Now I feel sad. =(
Reply
:iconcaldorosa:
CaldoRosa Featured By Owner Sep 7, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
Nice tribute
Reply
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