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September 23, 2013
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Dave Elliott, An Authentic Citizen

Mon Sep 23, 2013, 1:57 PM






Weirding Willows

A New Wind Lifts Storytelling


First imagined as a bedtime tale for his son by Kenneth Grahame in 1908, The Wind in the Willows has remained in the top twenty children’s stories ever since. But things have been getting weird out in the Willows, as the new comic on deviantART, Weirding Willows, will attest to.


Badger, Mole, Ratty and Mr. Toad are back… but they’re joined by Alice, Frankenstein’s Monster, Mowgli, The White Rabbit, Peter Rabbit and Benjamin Bunny as they defend the world from the Wicked Witch of the West, Doctor Moreau, the Mad Hatter, Mister Hyde and the Queen of Hearts (not to mention the flying nightmare monkeys from Wizard of Oz.)



dino

















The new direction taken by Weirding Willows, recently published in multiple formats, reflects the new worldwide comic audience being opened up by the Internet and the new technologies and the needs and desires of that audience being serviced by those who recognize it.






C

reator and writer of Weirding Willows, Dave Elliott, is at once introducing beloved childhood fables and adolescent fright tales in Western culture to new readers, while re-imagining them for those of us already familiar with them on some level. Tying the separate strands of the disparate fantasies into a cohesive narrative is accomplished by centering the narration in a new Alice in Wonderland. And by “new” I mean smart and engaging—rather than being simply the target of CGI effects as she’s been reimagined in the latest studio rehashes. Librarians and teachers have been embracing Weirding Willows and are reporting a heightened interest in the classic “Frankenstein” and “Jekyll & Hyde” texts as well as a revisiting of all the other fantasy figures of bedtime tales. This new comic seems to be generating an interest in a dozen classic characters’ “back stories” and that couldn’t be better news for the future of fantastic storytelling.





amigos










No better an example of the new storytelling is to be found in Weirding Willows, published by Titan. What would have once been developed as a simple “mash-up” of diverse childhood story characters in a sort of very strange Justice League, Weirding Willows has the benefit of fan input into precisely which characters have been chosen to resurrect from deepest childhood dreaming as well as a continuing conversation with the story direction with the writer as the issues progress.









The new paradigm, wherein lies the future of storytelling—opens the next chapter in the history of pop literature.





A

funny thing happened on the way to the funeral for the storytelling narrative, its obituary written by the traditional publishing industry: the genre is thriving rather than dying, and with an infusion of more independent spirit and creativity than has ever before been possible. Weirding Wilows is a prime example. The Internet has done more to liberate rather than destroy storytelling, the new technology encouraging fan comment, contribution and even collaboration on an unprecedented scale. The publishing houses feared their loss of total control of dissemination of “IP” (intellectual property) would mean novels, comics and all other storytelling vehicles would be pirated into chaos, creators unable to find a way to get paid for their art.  Instead of this deathly scenario, a new dawn has broken – with fans exercising more direction over their favorite stories and characters while the narrative is still in creation.



Rodents

















Dave Elliott puts an enormous amount of effort into helping deviantART community members move forward as artists as they try to determine how they want to enter the industry.









After launching two of his own anthologies Dave has just announced, through a journal on his page, plans for a third regular anthology locked and loaded with deviant artists of every medium exclusively.






  • All of the artists hired to create artwork for Weirding Willows and Dave Elliott's Odyssey are all from the deviantART community.
  • Reviews portfolios for community members whenever he can.
  • Introduced spyed to Clydene Nee which launched the powerful collaboration between deviantART and Comic-Con for a newly reinvigorated Artists Alley.
  • Judged the first two deviantART San Diego Comic-Con scholarships reviewing 100's of portfolios  determining the finalists from the deviantART community.





  • In his free time he art directs deviants work when they've attained their first paying gig.
  • Three previously unpublished deviant artists work were featured on to the back of Heavy Metal magazine from a competition off of his own page.
  • A full issue of Heavy Metal Magazine will be curated form submissions from Dave's deviantART page. Go to his page for more details.

























T

he comics industry’s insiders know Dave as the go-to guy whose name alone will lend mighty credibility to any project in need of more lift to get off the ground. He’s the best coordinator and facilitator of talent in all comicdom. He’s the man who finds a way to make independent projects happen. What should be better known by the reader-consumers, fans and advocates of comic books and graphic novels is Dave’s extensive resume and well-deserved reputation as one of the most influential figures in the industry, as both creative artist and businessman.










For the last few years Dave Elliott has become known as one of the most sought after World Builders, an essential skill necessary to facilitate “Full Spectrum Narrative” IP development for the entertainment industry. From co-founding Radical Studios where he developed a new more realistic and grounded version of Hercules, that Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson is currently shooting under Brett Ratner’s direction, to co-founding Benaroya Comics, creators of Red Spike, Samaurai’s Blood, and The Marksman, all released last year through Image Comics.  Sam Sarkar’s comic series The Vault sold to Graham King after being co-developed and packaged by Dave.

















As the industry stands now, what are the best tips for breaking in?








:icondeevelliott:



I think the ‘Industry’ is being redefined right now. The traditional model of publishing is crumbling and what ‘is’ Industry has almost personal relevance now. If you draw Superman every month your idea of the Industry is the Direct Sale Market which caters to the 1,200–1,500 physical stores around the countrty. The Direct Sale Market expanded into the digital domain through companies such as Comixology and iVerse.



Breaking in is actually best done by proving you've got what it takes to do a great job and producing high quality, consistent, work.  Marvel and DC look towards IDW, Boomstudios, Dark Horse and Image Comics for their talent. They do that because there is no hiding when a creator can't keep their deadlines or has an emotional meltdown. Editors are also scouring deviantART for new talent. They're watching creators who post often, consistently and get a lot of traffic. If you do a piece of work that you want a specific editor to see tweet a link to them but don't always expect a response.  Don't send a Wolverine pin-up to the Batman editors. If you want to draw something in particular you're going to have to do some samples of that character. You can always get more eyeballs on your pages by doing mash-ups where characters meet who couldn't in their own books.  Have Batman meet the new Sherlock. Draw how you would imagine the Justice League would look in J. R. Tolkien's world. Have Blade and Buffy team up against the Twilight characters.  Images and ideas that will get people adding your images to their favorites and talking about them.  Send people to your deviantART page by using Facebook, Twitter and Instagram with teases.


All these additional hits will increase the chances of you getting noticed.










What are your top tips for launching a new story or intellectual property into the world?



:icondeevelliott:








First ask yourself do you love the idea or are you doing it because others might like it. You have to love your own idea and world. If you want it to resonate with an audience it has to resonate with you first. You have a far better chance of connecting with people if your heart is in it. It'll come through. It's no guarantee of success but your chances will be higher. Here's a small list of things that you must know before you start;


  • Know your world.
  • Know your characters.
  • Know the physics of your world and then make sure you stick to them.

If you have come up with the story first and are creating the characters afterwards, make sure they stay in character. Don't have them go against character just because you want something to happen, plan ahead. It sounds obvious but people run into it all of the time and many end up creating a new character just to move the story along. Those characters are always forgettable and a distraction.









Have you experienced having your comments and suggestions alter the narrative of stories-in-creation on deviantART or elsewhere?



:icondeevelliott:







Yes, we all suffer sometimes from being too close to our ideas and think that we've explained things out well enough only to find someone ask a really obvious question that leaves us scratching our heads.


This happened only recently when I posted a couple of pages of Weirding Willows up relying on everyone knowing who the characters were and the setting. You can't always rely on people having read all your deviantART entries or read every issue of your comic or book.


It's also happened when I've seen people warm to characters I wasn't expecting them to and after reading comments and seeing what they saw you have greater appreciation yourself for them. That happened when I decided to team Peter Rabbit and Benjamin Bunny with the White Rabbit. Their dynamic changed and I now want to do a set of stories focusing on just them (and their new friend Jack. Who isn't a rabbit).











Do you see artists considering the suggestions of other artists and fans as democratic or authoritarian, as community building or interference with artistic freedom and independence?



:icondeevelliott:





Every artist is different. Some just want fans. Some like the real artistic discussion of method and influences. Remember, when you post something you're going to get comments and not all of them you'll like. It is something we all need to come to terms with that not everyone will like what you do. Some may take time to warm up. It is your artistic freedom to post just as it is for someone to make a comment. It is how we react to those comments that will define how we grow as artists and as members of this community. You have your freedom and your independence and only you can give it away.














Do you think stronger (or weaker) mythic narratives will be the ultimate fruits of technological changes underway?



:icondeevelliott:















I believe if you want to connect with as many people as possible using a mythic narrative is essential especially if you ever plan to open up your narrative to others to participate in. A well thought out mythology to the world (no matter how real or grounded) adds to the believability of it and encourages immersion into it. Techgnotic came up with the best term for the development of a story or concept that can spread across many different platforms and art forms; “Full Spectrum Narrative.” We are all in this new technological age of communication. A single device can be a book, a comic, a video game, an animation and they can all be about a single idea. Each medium can be a different facet of your concept, not just the retelling endlessly of the same story.  A rich mythology give you and others a universe to play in without once bumping into each other.










Can you talk a little bit about the artist, writer, producer collaboration when building new narrative worlds? Should creators be their own Editor/Producers?



:icondeevelliott:










We are all producers. We ‘produce’ our work. In this new age we also need to be our own editors. More and more we'll be assembling projects to be published ourselves rather than have a publisher come along and act as the producer for us. We all have to learn how to wear more than one hat. The process of sharing messages between each other isn't much different than utilizing social media to bring an audience to our work. Fortunately as deviantART has grown so has the variety of skills coming to the community. If you need a letterer or colorist or a model just write a journal. It may take a while but somebody will always know someone who you can talk to. In comics, the writer and the artist must become their own editor and production managers. They must learn how to assemble and format everything they need, figure out how to post it and then promote it. Good material will usually get discovered but banging the drum really does help.








Producing The Lost Kids has forced me to wear a lot more hats than I could ever have imagined. Dave is absolutely right; we must all be producers as well as editors for each new IP.  This takes someone with a lot of focus and energy and someone who knows how to surround himself with the right people for a direct delivery the audience.


Internet sites like deviantART have bridged the separation between creator and audience so that we are talking every reader, viewer or player in a very particular way. DeviantArt has done the same with creator and other talent. Now, being able to draw but not able to write or being able to write and not being able to draw or letter is no longer an excuse to abandon your vision. deviantART has killed that excuse. If you want to work on your own comic book, your novel, your film, your art, but lack skill in certain areas, you can now find artists to collaborate with who can fill in the blanks.


The Lost Kids and Weirding Willows are prime examples of artists coming together for a single vision, for a single story. What aspiring story creators should take from their example is that your own project is possible if you put in the time, energy and focus to put together the team you need. If you have a vision, you can now assemble the right support team—and be gathering feedback from your audience throughout the process. Storytelling is a very collaborative medium and Internet sites like deviantART are making it more and more possible and more and more fun.


:iconfelipecagno:FelipeCagno






A wonderful example of the potential of deviantART and how to use it to build out your concept even if you're not an artist is FelipeCagno and his series The Lost Kids. His ideas resonated with so many artists he was able to persuade them to do pieces that he could post on his page and in doing so designed his characters and gave life to his world. He is about to finally release his comic series on multiple formats.






































:iconbws:



Bradley W. Schenck


“I like Bradley's work because you can tell that from time to time he wants to get lost in his own details of the world he has created for his Thrilling Tales of the Downright Unusual adventure series. He has created a world spawned by his own interests and his love for them pulls you in.”


–Dave Elliott












:icondrunken-novice:



Possibly drunk right now


“Maybe it's a generational thing but I really miss the three panel newspaper strip format in this age of digital news.

2GAG (Two Guys and Guy) is a reflection on society and how we interact with each other in relationships. It is also very funny because of that. I've found myself laughing at myself many times.”


–Dave Elliott



























:iconcrystalcurtis:



HUNDREDS of antiseptics!


Lost in the Vale is a lovely series produced by Julie and Alan Curtis. Julie's artwork seems to mix several influences, such as manga, anime and traditional American comics, but doesn't adhere to any and so she's created her own look that appeals to several different tastes.

Her deviantART page complements her website nicely where you can see all the designs and thought processes going on.”


–Dave Elliott












:iconhandmade-crown:



Wah! What'd I do?


Plume is an awesome fantasy, action, supernatural western. Hopefully this will find a good publisher that will get it out to a wider audience. K. Lynn Smith has a fun series here that should appeal to most ages and sexes.

There is a universe built around Plume that even though it is only hinted at you know it is there and that she's not about to run out of story material soon.”


–Dave Elliott






















:icontcypress:



Toby Cypress


“Toby Cypress is one of those artists who grows and grows on you. His influences are diverse but don't expect all those influences to show in his art as many of them influenced what he draws more.

Toby decided to not bother waiting for the main comic publishers to discover his talents, instead he went it alone and self published Rodd Racer through his own company Punkrock Jazz Publishing and has been working on his next big project KURSK that he's gearing up for a Kickstarter launch but has been sharing pages and designs of his deviantART pages.”


–Dave Elliott











:iconpumpkinbear:



Rowal


“Humor is usually tied by geography and local circumstances. MAD magazine used to be awesome when every country could do its own thing. Carpediem, created by Rhoald Marcellius (from STELLAR Labs), is one of those action strips filled with humor that crosses every border. It wouldn't have been out of place in MAD magazine and, I'm going out on a limb here, it may just be the next Tank Girl.”


–Dave Elliott




















  1. Have you experienced having your comments and suggestions alter the narrative of stories-in-creation on deviantART or elsewhere?
  2. Do you like the idea of story narratives being opened up to “consumer” preferences pre-publication—or do you prefer to hold your comments until after the author has completed his or her vision?
  3. What are your favorite story collaborations on deviantART?
  4. Can you share your own favorite top storytelling and OC building tips with the community?
  5. Do you think comic book publishers are making comics for you or for themselves? Does this drive you to make your own?











Looking for an exclusive insiders view on participating in the Comic book/graphic novel indusry. Look no further than this journal series "Acts Of Creation."





• • •









Weirding Willows, a new wind lifts storytelling. First imagined as a bedtime tale for his son by Kenneth Grahame in 1908, The Wind in the Willows has remained in the top twenty children’s stories ever since. But things have been getting weird out in the Willows, as the new comic on deviantART, Weirding Willows, will attest to. Badger, Mole, Ratty and Mr. Toad are back… but they’re joined by Alice, Frankenstein’s Monster, Mowgli, The White Rabbit, Peter Rabbit and Benjamin Bunny as they defend the world from the Wicked Witch of the West, Doctor Moreau, the Mad Hatter, Mister Hyde and the Queen of Hearts (not to mention the flying nightmare monkeys from Wizard of Oz.)

Writers: $techgnotic
Designers: $marioluevanos
Add a Comment:
 
:iconchrishdzart:
ChrisHdzArt Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Thank you for all the advice. Note that I'm making this a PDF :)
Reply
:iconthebattlefart:
THEbattlefart Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2013  Professional General Artist
good advice. Thank you.
Reply
:iconskyelacey:
SkyeLacey Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
im looking for artist, ive copyrighted my book "Charlies Revolution".... its a fictional book with top secret information and controversial ideology.. plz, someone help me brake the spell of Zionsm by teaching the youth the truth.
Reply
:iconimadgin:
Imadgin Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2013
I have written a story aimed at 3 to 6 year old children. I am in the process of completing the illustrations. I have had the opportunity to read the story to a couple of classes and the kids laughed in all the right spots, so I feel I am on the right track. It seems you can only get published if you have previously been published. What avenues can I take? Cheers Madeline
Reply
:icondeevelliott:
DeevElliott Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
Hi Madeline,

Yes, it is incredibly difficult to break into the print publishing arena if you're just starting out.  The way publishing works is undergoing a huge change right now. Publishers are looking at published artists but many of them are turning to self publishing to get noticed.  This is very time consuming but there are very few openings any more for artists who just draw.  You have to wear many hats, so publisher, marketing, production as well as creator.

One suggestion I can make is to try adapting your book as a MadeFire book. The tools are going to be made accessible to the community soon (probably early in 2014). For a younger audience it might go down better as an interactive experience.  Once you have established in one medium you should find it easier to get it noticed elsewhere.

You can also try crowd-funding the costs of printing if you decide to self publish.

Good luck.

- Dave
Reply
:iconidphotoshoper:
IDphotoshoper Featured By Owner Oct 27, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
great this one,, i love to read your article
Reply
:iconfoxmantle:
foxmantle Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I enjoyed what I've read of your article so far & I hope to learn more about how to build my characters & story.
So far my son & I have built it as we go, But we've branched off in our story lines & I'm trying to build the world for my characters.
How much planning ahead in my world should I have?
Reply
:icondeevelliott:
DeevElliott Featured By Owner Oct 27, 2013
Planning depends on you.  Some work out everything meticulously ahead others prefer a looser framework to give them more play.  I have written a lot about the world and the characters for the Weirding Willows but only a couple of paragraphs on each story I want to tell.  For me too much planning ahead of time takes the fun out of the journey.  I like surprises myself.

The thing I would suggest is that unless you and your son are writing your stories purely for yourselves, you should organize them a little better.  I had to dig around to realize chapter 1 was written by your son (?) and you had to go back and forth.  I'd also give a little more description about the world and the people that inhabit it, if not within the story then as separate journals that people could read first.

Good luck and have fun.
Reply
:iconfoxmantle:
foxmantle Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you, I appreciate your time & advice.
At first, we were together, but then we started to separate in our ideas.
I was hoping to be able to work together with him while hopefully, standing apart, because he wants to stay in an already established world by other authors for a while, the D & D world of the Forgotten Realms.
I do not, I wish to build my world instead.

I'll share this information with him to see what he wants to do.
Either way, I intend to continue with my storyline in Winters Respite & I'll apply what you told me.

Again , Thank you.
Reply
:iconfoxmantle:
foxmantle Featured By Owner Dec 13, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
P.S. May I make you a friend on deviantART?
Reply
:iconfenixindustries:
FenixIndustries Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2013  Student General Artist
Can anyone give me some advice on creating comics traditionally (I am absolutely HORRIBLE at working digitally)? I can pencil easily enough, and I'd like to learn to ink and colour, but how do I find (and choose) someone to collaborate with if I decide to go that way? And does anyone have any tips on learning to ink and colour, other than "practice makes perfect"?
Reply
:icondeevelliott:
DeevElliott Featured By Owner Oct 26, 2013
Based on the little I saw on your dA page I would start out be copying as many different artists as possible. Trace and copy their work while at the same time studying human anatomy.  Don't just learn to draw comics while copying.  Studying the varying approaches to the way different artists approach storytelling.  Storytelling is as important as the actual drawing itself.

As a test, why don't you try adapting a sequence from a film or TV show.  You can pause the scenes to pick the right moment to illustrate.  Your eye is a camera and your approach should be the same as a film directors only yours is a little harder because you have to pick a moment to illustrate a mood or scene where they can use movement.

It's also best to focus just on drawing for the time being. Inking can come with practice but don't get hung up on the finishes before you have the basics down. Experiment with pens, markers, brushes as well as pencils.  With all the different technologies at your disposal and reproduction techniques you can have your work colored directly from your pencils or use ink or watercolor washes.

It doesn't hurt if you look at artists who are doing the type of material you want to do. Some artists look at artists outside of comics, so don't restrict yourself to only looking at comic artists.

Good luck.

- Dave
Reply
:iconfenixindustries:
FenixIndustries Featured By Owner Oct 27, 2013  Student General Artist
fav.me/d6s167p

Just a small sketch following your advice, but I was wondering if you you tell me if there was anything I could be specifically working on given my skills?

I'll be trying to get my hands on an anatomy book or two and practising whenever I can using other artists work, as well as storytelling.

Thank you so much for the advice you've given me so far, I really appreciate it, especially considering I'm currently living in a country were any art classes would be in a foreign language (a little hard to learn when you don't understand the teacher!). Also, I was wondering, seeing as you see a lot of other people's work, would you be able to point me towards some adventure and supernatural comics and graphic novels?
Reply
:iconskyelacey:
SkyeLacey Featured By Owner Nov 1, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
HMU, we might be able to help each other
Reply
:icondeevelliott:
DeevElliott Featured By Owner Oct 27, 2013
It's difficult to comment as I haven't seen the original, but let me throw it back at you.  Why did you copy this particular piece and what were you looking to learn from it?

Here's a link I'm posting to some PDF copies of Andrew Loomis' art books that you should find very useful:

www.hightail.com/download/OGhk…

Andrew Loomis died in the late 1950's so he won't be upset you're downloading his books.  His art is very classical illustration that I think will serve as a good basis for where you want to go later.

As far as other artists work to look at I'd recommend looking for yourself and making your own mind up.  For a start you can look through the artists I follow on my page and pick for yourself.  They're all very different and have very different styles.

When thinking about the supernatural and horror a lot of it is about pacing, storytelling and lighting.  Experiment in drawing objects and people lit to give a strong contrast.

Yours,

- Dave
Reply
:iconfenixindustries:
FenixIndustries Featured By Owner Oct 27, 2013  Student General Artist
Thanks a ton for the tips, they're all really helpful.

Most of my art isn't actually on DeviantArt (silly, I know), especially the more up to date stuff. I'm sure you're quite busy, but if I upload some more and send you a link, could you have another look? It probably won't be for a couple of weeks though...
Reply
:icondeevelliott:
DeevElliott Featured By Owner Oct 27, 2013
I can't promise when I'll get back to you, but yes, send me some stuff to take a look at.

- Dave
Reply
:iconsilentgirlatacorner:
silentgirlatacorner Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2013  Professional General Artist
Thanks so much. This really helped. I'm a comic artist/writer and I've been having trouble getting an audience for my work. Thank you so much. 
Reply
:iconmikyruiz:
Mikyruiz Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2013  Professional General Artist
wow so much wonderful work! Great site!
Reply
:iconwhitejadezest:
Whitejadezest Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Brilliant insight to the background 'how' for a multi-platform trilogy project in progress.
Much appreciated :D
WJZ
Reply
:iconkarliah49:
Karliah49 Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2013  Hobbyist Artist
Really awesome I loved the pictures and the words:D
Reply
:iconpatou-crea:
patou-crea Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2013  Hobbyist Artist
<font><font class="">superbe  j'adore</font></font>
Reply
:iconsniper0092:
Sniper0092 Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Excuse me, I am a writer, would you like to read my work? fav.me/d61hp7t
Reply
:iconsniper0092:
Sniper0092 Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Nice
Reply
:iconzhoutengshan:
zhoutengshan Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2013
Thank you very much, I wish you healthy and happy every day
Reply
:icondeevelliott:
DeevElliott Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2013
You too!! Have a great weekend.
Reply
:iconzhoutengshan:
zhoutengshan Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2013
Hello, thank you very much, I wish you good health, yes, weekend will go out at night,
Reply
:iconthepolishgirl:
thepolishgirl Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
OSM O_O
Reply
:iconfiendmaz:
fiendmaz Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
4. Can you share your own favorite top storytelling and OC building tips with the community?

Just my opinion since I'm still a newbie when it comes to writing. Hah. I just like writing. I suppose my favourite storytelling tips would be to add much depth into the imagery that would give the audience a feel of how the story is without any character saying a word and without any mentions of how it should be. I feel images of scenes are extremely important and invaluable. After that would be a similarly in-depth description of how the characters are. Any minute detail like blinking or moving of the head can be interpreted into many words and emotions. Details make storytelling go into another level and become truly beautiful.

As for OCs... it's best to go with a character that you are extremely familiar with. Only then will the OC seem like a real character or person. You have to know the OC inside and out. All the quirks, the habits, the likes and dislikes, and so on. Big details like personality and look creates the OC but small details like quirks and habits makes the character.
Reply
:icondeevelliott:
DeevElliott Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2013
Great point!  Every detail counts, even if you're the only person who will ever know it.

Thanks for adding to the conversation.
Reply
:iconfiendmaz:
fiendmaz Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
That's true. It does give me a sense of fulfillment though I do hope that my readers pick up on it as well even if unconsciously.

You're welcome! It was my pleasure :)
Reply
:iconmaxx-marshall:
Maxx-Marshall Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
A really great journal!!! Thanks for the Tips!!!
Reply
:iconnicko025:
nicko025 Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2013   General Artist
so good designing, wow
Reply
:iconstar-dream:
star-dream Featured By Owner Oct 17, 2013
first rule in story writting is that there are no rules. do what you want, its art, its an expression. it doesn't have to be liked, just share it with the world.


imagination has no limits and there is no standard that we really need to aim to reach. children mostly have the most creative ideas because they don't limit themselves. what an experienced professional adult would overlook following common sense a child would find.

because they don't think about rules, they don't know them yet. imaginary or real rules. imagination has no rules. thats the point.

there are all kind of arts, some arts try to mimic the real world and are bound by the rules if the writer wants so.

some arts are free in every way as a bird. thats the beaty of it.

now, some artists make things because they like them, some artists make presents for their friends, some artists like to have fun with their friends and together work on a story. again, we need no standards, keep both, keep it all.

the stories we write, how they will be, to every single letter and who will write them with us, or inspire us and what they're inspired with and everything about them, its all up to us.
Reply
:iconmetaa:
MeTaa Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2013   Digital Artist
The covers for these comics are always so top-notch!!!
Reply
:iconkoolkat2334:
koolkat2334 Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2013  Student Writer
Ummm, I know that this may or may not be your...Well, ur thing but I need help. How do I get over writers block?  I have a lot of stuff for my first Fan Fiction already down, and then when I read through the book I'm in to get any ideas, I can't think of any. Help, please!  
Reply
:icondeevelliott:
DeevElliott Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2013
Sounds like you don't know what your story is yet.

Try writing up a summation of what it is you want to do in 100 words.

Then expand that to 500 words but give it a beginning, middle and an end.  One paragraph for each.

Look again at your notes, isolate the main characters that will push the narrative and make sure they're developed correctly and you have all the background information on them.  If it is Fan Fiction and you're playing with someone else's characters, make sure they stay in character and that their actions can tell the story you want them to.

Now take those 500 words and make them 5000 words.  Make sure the characters are layered in through the story and you know when and where you're using them.  You can also do this with note cards and pin them to the wall.

By this time you should be well over your writers block.

:-)
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:iconroos-skywalker:
Roos-Skywalker Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013  Student Digital Artist
I am going to put your comment in a journal crediting you for your great help!
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:iconkoolkat2334:
koolkat2334 Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2013  Student Writer
Thanks....a ton....:D
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:icondeevelliott:
DeevElliott Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2013
Hope it helped.

- Dave
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:iconkoolkat2334:
koolkat2334 Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013  Student Writer
-Hi Dave,
Sorry if I am bugging you....but may you please read my FanFiction...
Thanks
-Jordyn
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:icondeevelliott:
DeevElliott Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013
No worries about bugging me, but I'm at New York Comic-con so won't be able to get to it until it is over.

Best,

- Dave
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:iconkoolkat2334:
koolkat2334 Featured By Owner Oct 10, 2013  Student Writer
Lucky!! Have a great time!
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:icontonyjeffers:
TonyJeffers Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2013  Student
This is awesome Dave! Seems like a great opportunity :wow:
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:iconzuhalovemusic:
ZuhaLoveMusic Featured By Owner Oct 4, 2013  Professional Interface Designer
good drawings, very interesting!
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:icondeevelliott:
DeevElliott Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2013
I rely a lot on some great artists to make me look good.

:-)

Thanks,

- Dave
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:iconkungfusalsa:
KungFuSalsa Featured By Owner Oct 3, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Wow I'm really inspired by what I've read here! I'm actually debuting my comic next week at New York Comic Con! If anyone's interested,  you can check it out at: www.tommeldesign.com/division


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:icondeevelliott:
DeevElliott Featured By Owner Oct 5, 2013
That looks great.  I think I'm in the same aisle as you.  Love to take a look.

See you there.
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:iconkungfusalsa:
KungFuSalsa Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Holy crap I didn't see your message until right now!!! 

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:icondeevelliott:
DeevElliott Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
Hahaha! No worries.  Next time.

:-)
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