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December 31, 2012
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Dedication to a New Year

Mon Dec 31, 2012, 4:39 PM





        

        










Nuances of an Annual Ritual
















Which brings us to each year’s communal celebration of the passing of our lifetimes:

New Year’s Eve



So what did you “actually get done” in the past year? How closer are you to a grand goal in life? An assessment is made and then the inevitable Step 2 of the yearly process is engaged, which is often a word for word repeat of last year’s Step 2:

The New Year’s Resolution











There seem to be two main strategies that emerge at this point of facing the New Year, a “brand new morning.”  The lone wolf quietly acknowledges goals not yet reached, and is even more secretive in the “new plan.”  “I’ll show them,” becomes the new private mantra.  It works for some people, but my experience has been that I’m splurging on Star Wars memorabilia by Valentine’s Day.


I’ve found that rather than making secret contracts with myself, a much higher success rate is always achieved as a combination of two other elements.












Pablo Picasso













To a truly worthy vision, maybe even one that cannot be achieved in a year, but in a lifetime, is just the sort of quest that engages the starving soul so much more than the common shaving a few digits off of the weight scale. (I personally implemented the "no cookie left behind" program this holiday season so I might want to think about that one too.) But the truth is, New Year’s comes but once a year. It would seem better to me to go big or not at all. Pick projects of real importance in your life – ones that require the more personal attention and dedication to the better.




Should not be a dirty word in the strategies of personal achievement. It has been my experience that the more genuinely useful support I’ve received from the like-minded (as well as the merely curious) has always gone a long way to keeping my Big Picture from faltering. When the potholes in the road forward begin to resemble archeological digs, as it seems they usually do, there’s nothing more heartening in being able to take it all in stride than a word of admiration, advice or encouragement from a fellow dA community member.











In his book "Outliers" Malcolm Gladwell outlines the 10,000-Hour Rule, the thought being that spending ten thousand hours practicing a particular discipline is necessary for mastery of that skill. He also brings up the importance of support in the from family, friends, and mentors in the ultimates success of an individual. No one achieves the highest summit's of success alone. No one. Even the most unique vision requires the nurture of human camaraderie if it is to be developed to it's fullest potential and efficacy.








I find myself thinking about recent achievements as well as a grand vision currently in formation here at deviantART, and how much the atmosphere of this community – how much dedication to art and artists, and how much they are supported and support each other – and I can’t wait to see where life will take all of us in this new year.  A tough statement to put out there, considering the unbearable horrors that have recently rained down in our world from weather catastrophes, classroom atrocities, civil wars and the violence related to a radically altered political landscape around the world.  But it’s true.  I am still hopeful.  I am still ready to rededicate my dreams on New Year’s Eve. I’m not sure I’d be making that statement were I not now ensconced and engaged in the deviantART community.  But as Kurt Vonnegut used to say, “So it goes.”





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For the Reader




1.


Do you make New Year’s resolutions? If not, why not?




2.


Does a goal achieved with the help and support of friends in any way diminish the power of that achievement, or does it become something made all the more memorable and special because of the participation?




3.


What’s the most farfetched resolution you’ve ever declared?




4.


What is your yearly resolution that has still never been achieved?




5.


Do you think it helps to rededicate oneself to a cause, no matter how large or small, regardless of how many times the attempt has failed?




6.


Can you share with us the personal discipline system that works for you as an artist in bringing your work to a next level?




7.


More specifically do you have any tips for those of us balancing multiple responsibilities along with our creative endeavors?









New Year's resolutions are often secret and private -- a contract made with yourself. But what if you could increase the chance of your resolution becoming a success by incorporating a combination of two other important elements: discipline and success.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconpurplehope:
PurpleHope Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
:D
Reply
:iconspyderzt:
SpyderZT Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
1. Do you make New Year’s resolutions? If not, why not?

No. Because I think that self work should be a constant effort, and giving yourself the "Crutch" of "I'll get to it next year", or "This Time..." etc. seems to do more harm than good. I am this year trying to do a 365 Day Challenge... but I don't consider that a "Resolution" just a well timed project. You may have your own interpretations. ;P


2. Does a goal achieved with the help and support of friends in any way diminish the power of that achievement, or does it become something made all the more memorable and special because of the participation?

Neither. A Goal Accomplished is a goal accomplished. If you succeeded, kudos. If you needed/wanted help for it, then that's what it took, and congrats on that realization. ;P


3. What’s the most farfetched resolution you’ve ever declared?

I'm sure I had some whoppers when I was younger... but I don't recall any of them.


4. What is your yearly resolution that has still never been achieved?

I am on a constant path towards better/more frequent creative expression.


5. Do you think it helps to rededicate oneself to a cause, no matter how large or small, regardless of how many times the attempt has failed?

I think it depends on the cause. If you are trying to improve something, it's almost always good to keep trying to improve. With a re-dedication though should also come a reevaluation to see if your current methods are likely to succeed where they have not in the past, and to improve upon them if they aren't.


6. Can you share with us the personal discipline system that works for you as an artist in bringing your work to a next level?

Unfortunately, I haven't "Succeeded" in bringing my art to the next level. But I am now trying a "Do it regardless of whether you 'Feel It' Approach". We'll see if this is successful.


7. More specifically do you have any tips for those of us balancing multiple responsibilities along with our creative endeavors?

I am one of those. All I can say is that if you truly want something, there will not alway be time for it. Period. That's the way of life. You've created a system for your life that works for your currently existing elements. To add something to that structure will take work, and change, and it won't necessarily be easy. It may even require giving something else up. It is up to you to decide how much you "Want" this, and make changes accordingly.
Reply
:iconbeepear:
beePear Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2013  Professional Traditional Artist
1. I do. I don't always remember what they are, and I usually have a hard time coming up with things. All the same I think about things I want to accomplish, and for a couple of years I've been posting them on my blogs.

2. Definitely not. When people are there to support you, they're also there to celebrate the success! Plus, it's so much easier to let things slide when you don't have people checking in on you. A friend showed me this really awesome site: SupperBetter, that helps you track your goals and recruit friends. Granted it's like any other tool, it only works when you utilize it.

3. Honestly I don't remember.

4. Posting on a regular schedule. I'm getting better, but it still needs work.

5. Yes, it does help to rededicate oneself. You refresh in your mind what it was you wanted to do, and why you wanted to do it, which can help bring back the momentum. Particularly, look into the why and see if anything about this cause/goal has changed and what you would like to change about it. For example: drawing in charcoal everyday, maybe you've learned you don't really like charcoal and after discovered ink you find you really love ink. The goal could change to drawing in ink everyday. Or maybe drawing in a different medium everyday to expand your horizons.

6. Drawing exercises. Swapping challenges with friends. Breathing exercises to calm me down from the fear of trying something new (I tend to be afraid of ruining something).

7. Dedicate some time to your art. Make it a priority. Look at the things you do everyday, is there something that you could cut out (like Facebook/tv)? Is there something you do that you can also include your art (like drawing while watching tv or at a restaurant with friends waiting for food)? If you have kids, set up an activity day where they can work on arts and crafts too. If you have a messy place and need to get that organized, try something like UFYH (this site is described as "Terrifying motivation for lazy people with messy homes" and has a lot of profanity, but is still super awesome with tips and stories from other people who have messy houses too). They use a 20/10 system (20 min work, 10 min break). Applied to art you could do 20 min art, 10 min of something else. Or if you really feel the cleaning is higher on the priority, 20 min cleaning, 10 min of art....
Reply
:icongeek4life14:
geek4life14 Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
my answers to the questions! :) [link]
Reply
:iconlivelovelifeeleni:
LivelovelifeEleni Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
this IS YOUR YEAR YOU GUYS
BE MOTIVATED, HAPPY AND INSIRED<3

GO GO GO! <3
Reply
:icondoertchen:
Doertchen Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
I think your comment should me my resolution, haha! :love:
Reply
:iconargolith:
Argolith Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
I never make New Year’s resolutions. The reason for this is that there's nothing special about New Year’s Eve. People who think about their goals in life only once a year are bound to fail, because real improvement requires constant effort. I prefer to have my goals in mind all the time.
Reply
:iconsayuri14:
Sayuri14 Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2013  Student Writer
1. No, I don't make New Year's resolutions. Why? Well, the journal explains it better. I rather take one or three tasks and concentrate on them, rather than a list of things I know I won't be able to accomplish. I'm not a multi-task person. I do one thing at a time, but whatever that "thing" is, I do my best. I know my limits, and I know you always have to go beyond them, but I'm not going to pretend something I'm not.

2. Well, I've always paved my own path. If I fail, I want to fail by my own mistakes, rather than succeeding by the favor of others. This doesn't mean I don't take advice or accept help from my friends; I do listen to those dear to me. What I'm saying is that, in a world in which most people like to take the easy road, I want to walk that path of which most are afraid of.

3. Eeeh...well, when I was younger, I set the goal of achieving the highest score in every single class.

4. Losing weight.

5. It does help, you learn from your mistakes and it takes several "tries" to get to your goal.

6. Well, I focus one aspect at a time. I research and practice as much as I can. Having an organized schedule helps, but that depends on the person, since everyone has a unique working method suitable for them.

7. Sorry to say, but I don't have any advice, since I don't have multiple responsabilities :s Although, if I did had multiple responsabilites, I would finish the most demanding task first, and then move on with the creative work. The method I use for Uni is to finish all my reports/investigations/homework beforehand, and I use the free time before the due date to...well, write or relax :P
Reply
:iconm-g-studio:
M-G-Studio Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
No disrespect to people that do those resolutions but I find that stupid. Life throws situations at you that teaches you more about yourself. How do you know what you must change at the beginning of the year when you haven't noticed some things about yourself? People should work on themselves all year long, catch themselves about to do something that they want changed and decide not to do it. There's a perfect quote that goes, "self control is knowing you can but deciding you won't"

The reason new year resolutions don't work for many people is because it feels like they are forced to do those things. The best way to achieve it is by creating a visualization board. Humans (especially guys) are visual creatures that get inspired by what they see. Cut out/print out images of things that inspire you to lose weight/eat healthy/make more art/etc. then you'll be inspired to do the things needed to get to the place you wish to be.

Stop making forced lists and start inspiring yourself. It's the only way to true motivation!
Reply
:iconredpandaapple:
RedPandaapple Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2013  Student Digital Artist
Happy New Year!
Reply
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