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When a subject poses to have his or her photograph taken, the subject tries to project a message about himself or
herself by how he or she “poses”, by the attitude of his or her body language or facial expression.

If the subject is posed by the photographer, the body pulled and prodded into the desired angles,
the facial expression “directed”, it is the photographer who is intending to communicate a message.
In either case, posing or posed, there is undeniably something “false” in the representation. Perhaps
the only “true” thing being represented in this art is a record of how people being photographed or
people photographing other people misrepresent reality for whatever their reasons. Perhaps it’s human
to always want to show a life that’s a little prettier, happier, better.












Grisha 3 by jivotnoetwo good friends by VaggelisFragiadakislooking for by M0THartFree Play by Hengki24







Street Photography takes direct aim at this “falseness” by taking the camera into the streets to record “true”
documentary moments in life.  The subjects are usually unaware as they go about their lives, having no time to strike
a pose to enhance or send a particular message about those lives. There are surely flaws in this simple theory of what
is “truthful” and therefore worthy of possibly being designated “art” as opposed to what is obvious artifice (posings)
which make the “art” designation more problematic.  Certainly there is brilliant artistic photographic portraiture, but
is the art more in the skill in lights and shadows and operating the camera and other equipment itself – vs “capturing”
the soul of the subject?

















Of course even in “the street” there’s the kids smiling for Dad’s lens in the backyard pool, and what could be more
posed than a celebrity red carpet event?  But “real” street photography is all about the capture of unscripted, un-posed
moments from human being’s lives where and when a little bit of their true selves is exposed “naked” for just a moment,
and a true documentary of a true event in human history, comic or ironic, heartwarming or horrifying, is recorded for all eternity.


Shakespeare said, “All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players.”




But sometimes, when looking at a masterful street photographer’s work, we can at least pretend that all in our lives
is not mere artifice, and that there are “real people” out there amongst all those “actors”, real people just living their lives.










Questions for the Reader:



  1. Does the act of posing subjects for photographic composition, to your mind, in any way compromise or lessen the value of the photo as “art”?
  2. Do you prefer posed or “candid” photographs of your pop heroes?  Are paparazzi ever “artists” or is their “art” too assaultive to merit such consideration?
  3. Do you think photography best captures the representational “essence” of a person photographed, or is a person’s essence best represented by a sketch artist or great painter?  (Or even a poet?)
  4. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle tells us that by observing a subject, we change it in that moment, therefore “negating” or “falsifying” any representation we seek to “capture” or “know”.  Is art, to your mind, about achieving the closest possible representation of the “truth” about a subject – or is it more about the artist’s desire to capture just for a moment the eternally unknowable?













Add a Comment:
 
:icongeoperno:
Geoperno Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2012
Agree with MorphoAdonis comments. Though at this point in time I find Street photography probably the most interesting, if that was all that was available, I would get very tired of it and photography. What I have enjoyed in the short time in DA is that anyone can submit anything. That to me is an ideal world where freedom is permitted and encouraged and we are able to choose as we wish. I don't understand why people shoot dolls or their pet cats but I certainly would not look down on them because of it. That is their world. It does not impose itself on me.live and let live. Encourage people, don't divide the people. I have a lot of respect for street photographers, it is, in my opinion a very difficult form of photography which requires great reflex of mind, creativity and technical proficiency in a split second. But I do get a feeling of arrogance or perhaps a patronizing attitude from the typical street photographer towards other forms of photography. Anyway, try to avoid a class elitism from developing just because you are good at what you do. Enjoy all around you and make it better if you can.
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:iconslpimpressions:
SLpImpressions Featured By Owner Mar 2, 2012
NICE!....
I actually had someone try to tell me that 'Staged Street Shots' are acceptable street.
Sort of goes against everything one would hope to be a 'candid' moment captured.
*
Does the act of posing subjects for photographic composition, to your mind, in any way compromise or lessen the value of the photo as “art”?
NO---if it is not falsely calming itself to be a candid shot


Do you think photography best captures the representational “essence” of a person photographed, or is a person’s essence best represented by a sketch artist or great painter? (Or even a poet?)

All depends on who is behind the camera....How good their intuitive sight is.


The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle tells us that by observing a subject, we change it in that moment, therefore “negating” or “falsifying” any representation we seek to “capture” or “know”. Is art, to your mind, about achieving the closest possible representation of the “truth” about a subject – or is it more about the artist’s desire to capture just for a moment the eternally unknowable?

Too complicated to even think about.
art---is art.
truth is truth...there cannot be two truths.
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:iconpetach123:
Petach123 Featured By Owner Feb 24, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Hi. I have not been around for a while.......so I am pleased to discover you used my "kiss, look, hurry by" photo as part of your article. What can I say? but thanks!
Regards
Pete
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:iconambhal:
Ambhal Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2012
I love candid shots. I suppose candids open up a fourth wall/the lens and engage the viewer. The shots encourage the creation of a story to go with a singular moment in time.
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:iconalpacaastronauta:
AlpacaAstronauta Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2012  Hobbyist
My english is not that good, but i can't keep silence.

Como en la mayoría de las cosas no se trata ni de blanco ni de negro. Me atrevo a hablar del alma de una fotografía; es tan necesaria una buena composiciňn de luces, una selecciňn del fotografo y una direcciňn (aunque no sea concreta al modelo, la direcciňn tambičn estŕ en la selecciňn de un encuadre), pero es tambičn necesario capturar ese instante, ese no se quč que trasmiten ciertas fotos, LA ETERNIDAD DEL INSTANTE reducido y simplificado en un encuadre, un juego de luces y un gesto. He dicho.
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:iconsensoriumstudios:
SensoriumStudios Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2012  Student Interface Designer
Do people just walk up to others and ask "hey can i take a picture of you?"
Reply
:iconcharltonraims:
CharltonRaims Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2012   Writer
I think a person or event that is not posed shows you more of the beauty that city streets have to offer, but if you get caught taking pictures of people seemingly at random it is quite hard to explain what you doing, and I am not saying that a posed picture cannot be beautiful, but I just find the natural ones to have a certain truth and rawness to their beauty that makes them more alluring and powerful.
Reply
:iconfabnash:
FabNash Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2012
In photographing people all styles have artistic merit, but emotionally I have a leaning towards those captured without knowing. To me they inhabit themselves and that is particularly interesting to see.
Reply
:iconnikkij19:
Nikkij19 Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2012   Photographer
Its capturing a moment that is eternally unknowable. because whether a photo is posed or taken with them unaware and being a "real" moment you never really know how a person is just by looking at one picture of them. They could be caught in a moment of anger. or a moment of sadness. or a moment of complete happiness but does not mean that they are always like that. Looks can be decieving. Posed or otherwise I appreciate and enjoy and respect everyones art and photography. and try to see what they were trying to capture/expose/reveal. but sometimes only the artist knows, or doesnt even know himself. Sometimes inspiration just hits and you have to go with it. Sometimes moments are caught by accident, or missed. and sometimes you just want to pose. :)
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:iconosarme:
osarme Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2012
Insightful definition/description of street photography along with the selected supporting images. An aspect of the style you did not touch on, not essential though it is seen in some of the images, is juxtaposition of elements to lend a humorous and/or absurd quality. With or without this, the pictures often appear sort of jumbled, which can subtly contribute to the image, or make it appear a poor/random snapshot, or even both, perhaps depending on the viewer (Heisenberg all over again!)

Posing subjects or altering the scene in others ways does not increase or decrease artistic merit. Intervention must be considered very carefully if the result is to be presented as scientific or journalism, otherwise all is fair, it risks making the image seem artificial, which might then impact the result. I do not prefer one extreme or the other- I have seen great images of both types, works of Karsh or Doisenau come to mind as fully effective examples of posing. Paparazzi are another matter - excepting a scrum at an event which is already staged (your red carpets and so on) this seems more like illegal hunting than art or journalism.

I would not say any form best captures the 'essence' of the subject, or even that this can be captured - the art presents some aspect of what the subject projects and how the artist perceives it. Perhaps a collection of these could begin to represent waht is essential, and then one or two emerge as best summations.
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:icon17seconds:
17seconds Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Fantastic and inspiring. I have always loved street photography and would really love to start doing more of it. This has given me some things to think about and consider the next time I am out and about and happen to have some time to take some photos... thank you!
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:iconjoezhan:
joezhan Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
informative
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:iconbiga-nt:
BigA-nt Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Well done - you've captured the essence of street art. Its not the quality of the photography its the way the mopment is captured and what it means. That's what we are into too (www.ant-e-art.com) - we have enexhibition in Liverpool next month about the streets of Shanghai, and we have taken photos in Nepal, China, Japan, Liverpool and Gaza. My partner in crime (well in photography) captures street photos so well. My - I'm too shy. Hence my obsession with photoshop instead! This is a great feature - I've featured it on facebook and linked it on my own DA page! Well done with it. :D
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:iconcarjackarrest:
carjackarrest Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2012
1. Definitely not, it could even add to the value of the photo as “art” because in this way, the photographer gains more control by directing the model on how he/she should pose, or by correcting the lighting, etc etc. I think that an important thing we’re forgetting here is that art is actually man-made, anything natural or unaltered by any artist is technically not art.

2. I prefer good shots, candid or not. Some paparazzi may be artists, but you can't say that for all, 'cause not everyone could take good pictures. Their being assaultive doesn't affect their being an artist or not.

3. No, or at least not always. It would always depend on the artist's skill.

4. It could be both, but more of the latter.
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:iconawiepippo:
awiepippo Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2012
54 love
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:iconawiepippo:
awiepippo Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2012
love
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:iconshooshigraphy:
ShoOshiGraphy Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Beutiful work .. !
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:icondrexyseamfire:
DRexySeamfire Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
I have worked taking pictures in nightclubs and most of the time I ask if people want their photo take in which they pose, sometimes very badly sometimes almost perfectly. After the flash goes off the subjects go back to their normal state with the more real expressions on their faces, which I sometimes also capture if I take two photos, one after another. Its really interesting to see the changes in people when they pose for a photo.

Sometimes I like to experiment with different shots incorporating the crowd and a close up subject who is unaware of the camera. Or I might find some interesting people on the other side of the club, I just zoom in and capture the moment which is real and representative of the actual atmosphere of the club (of course it is a little different if you have a bit to drink, but in essence the club is the place to drink alcohol so you get a variety of photos representing the real moments that aren't poses with subjects being unaware). Sometimes in taking crowd shots I would get some odd and weird facial expressions if people happen to be looking in my direction, usually they are looking round for someone, checking out other people, looking blank at the crowd, all sorts.

Of course I do not need to ask permission to publish the photos, I was getting paid to do that. I always give out cards to the website where they will find their photo and most of the time I let the people see their photo/s. If they don't like it or don't want it posted I just delete it, or if they find a photo on the website that they don't like they can always ask to take it down.

I guess its a bit of a side subject to street photography, but the capture vs the pose still applies to what I used to do as a club photographer. Its very interesting to see the spectrum of representations in the capture, but the club and people do prefer the posed pictures. But then its not rare to capture a moment that beats any pose. xDD
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:iconshilolilo:
Shilolilo Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Agreed Morpho-Adonis! It makes little sense to pit one style against the other....

how real is street photography? I will agree it is real when there is no photoshop retouching done perhaps

Real is people in motion, once you freeze them for that moment, spend thousands on lenses and camera's, lighting, photoshop retouching...post production...I mean as far as "real" or not...it's rather academic....the "real" street stuff is still worked baby.....comparing the realness is all hazy gray stuff, how much $$, how many times do you take the shot.....how long do you agonise over shadow and highlight, vibrancy and exposure...SEPIA OR GREYSCALE OMG!!!!

That being said, real is also to me anything we see or touch, so that completely "set up" shots of people is as real as street photography...we can all see it and feel it, it is real baby.....there is power in both, the set up shots (I find) convey a more co-created vision of both the model and the photographer and I have to say I don't mind seeing the visions of more than one in a shot, you can see the underlying energies sometimes...there can be an attitude in the body language and face yet eyes that say "I'm freezing my tits off in this goddam shitsucking bikini in the middle of winter while the dumb ass photographer is sipping a piping hot double choc mocha latte and smoking a cigarette..."

The street shots, in a way you are capturing a persons mental chatter, whatever is going on in their head at that moment, their ego BS really.....and we all believe in the ego, it gets us every time, like this subject matter for instance......and my response ;)
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:iconanmlbri:
AnmlBri Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
A question: When doing street photography, am I required to get permission to photograph/publish photographs all of my subjects? If I ask permission beforehand it'll ruin the candid nature of the moment, so I presume I'd ask afterward. I'm a journalism student and one of the first things I learned is not to publish things without a subject's permission (at least the kind of work I was doing then. Investigative journalism is a whole 'nother can of worms). Does that rule apply here too? I would hate to post a photo of someone here on DeviantART or on my blog and have the subject find it and be outraged that I used their likeness without permission. It's not like I'd be profiting from it or anything, but I know some people are still touchy about having their image published places without their knowledge.
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:iconmakepictures:
makepictures Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2012
It depends on what country you are in. In the United States, you are free to photograph people in a public place while you are located in a public place. You are free to use those photographs journalistically and as fine art prints but, under various state laws, if you use the image to promote a business or product you would violate the individual's rights of publicity or rights of privacy unless you obtain permission in advance. Keep in mind that if your photograph manipulates the person in some fashion that results in holding them in a false light - - that is makes them look like they are doing something or acting as someone that is not accurate and that would hold them up to ridicule - - you can be liable to them for damages.
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:iconanmlbri:
AnmlBri Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I just finished up a class on Communication Law in school so I definitely see how all the rights of the person photographed come into play. Thanks for clearing this up. :-)
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:iconmakepictures:
makepictures Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2012
Happy to do so.
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:iconanmlbri:
AnmlBri Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I'd really love to take up street photography because I love the idea of "capturing moments" as one of my professors put it; the "essence" of a person. I just want to make sure I won't get bit in the bud by someone for doing it.
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:iconmorphoadonis:
MorphoAdonis Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
This seemed rather biased against poised photography, which I find rather distasteful.

A photographer has their own artistic expression through their camera; If they choose to capture an organic moment, there's a reason behind it. If they choose to create a moment to capture, there is still a reason for it. I resent the idea that one or the other is inherently "better."

Can you compare two photos and decide one is superior? Certainly, but that's a failure of the artist, not necessarily the type of photo.
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:iconwolfspirit4:
WolfSpirit4 Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2012
i think ima try it!!!!!
Reply
:icontepeeblanche:
tepeeblanche Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
c est super mais comment on traduit....
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:iconwindrose1013:
Windrose1013 Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
Black and white is my favorite kind of photography. These pictures are amazing and very intuitive.
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:iconguruzone:
Guruzone Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
As an amaeture photographer my experience can be summarised thus : > Candid pix have a soul of their own and beauty of such soul is unmistakably grasped even by the lay viewers. > Patience is a virtue a good photographer has to develop. This helps detect and capture those candid moments, which keep arising in between those conscious 'posed' frames. > Even for the so-called conscious shoots (as against candid ones), helping the subject to relax and be natural, right from the moment of first interaction, is another quality a good photographer has to learn and develop. > If the purpose of a photograph is to show some skill of a craftsman, then it is necessary that the photographer has a chat with him, understand and watch the process, grasp the most crucial aspect of the skill and then only say you are ready for the shoot. This will help you to capture the essence in a few frames from different angles and light conditions. > If you were a witness to an unusual happening involving persons, especially unknown, and you were lucky to have clicked the moment, as an individual you must respect the privacy of the person involved and take his/her consent on the spot for using the picture publicly. However, if the person photographed was doing someething blatantly illegal and unethical one should not seek prior consent but boldly expose it to the concerned authority or the public. That will be responsible behaviour by a photographic artist. I have a few photographs which fall into situations described above and would be only happy to share them on this site. Keep growing and be happy. Gurudatt Kundapurkar
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:iconateliersharka:
AtelierSharka Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
beautiful
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:iconcelsomasotti:
celsomasotti Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2012  Student Photographer
Great! =)
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:icon13vamps:
13vamps Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
i believe each kind of photos have their specialty... though street photography is by itself so touching and fulfilling and as you said above free of falseness. but posed ones taken by ourselves are a way preserving ones own special moments memories forever
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:iconyeajang:
yeajang Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2012
nice <<<
Reply
:iconbellezza-libert:
bellezza-libert Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I can't imagine that the act of posing in and of itself could possibly lessen the value of an image as "art". If that was the case one would also have to look at most "art" both visual and audible, no matter how well done or otherwise artistic, and assume that it is less artistic than a random splatter canvas or a random combination of sounds.

That being said the right of determining artistic value is granted only to the viewer and the opinions held are non-transferable. Each person must decide for themselves.

At the end of the day every artist is striving to convey a certain message from a certain point of view. That is the great strength of photography, allowing someone to view a moment in history that will never repeat. However, in allowing them to join us in viewing that moment we force them to do so from our perspective.

In a sense, even if the moment is candid, the viewer is posed precisely where we want them to view it.
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:icontrollkidsstock:
TrollKidsStock Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2012
Very well said
Reply
:iconxrazgrizzx:
xRazgrizzx Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2012
To answer questions 2 & 3 :

2. No, the paparazzi aren't artists, they're parasites. The pictures they take aren't art, just pictures (just because its a picture doesn't automatically make it art).

3. A person's essence isn't "best captured" by any one means, they're all equal - just different ways of doing it, and one way appeals more to one person than it does to another.
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:iconprozzaks:
prozzaks Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2012
Great food for thought. The article is also really well presented and the selected photographs are wonderful!

I don't think posing lessen the value of art; it's just another art form. Almost all studio photography involves the photographer suggesting a pose to his model or the model posing for the photographer. Does that make it something which is not art? I don't think so. It's not an unaltered vision of the subject. Personally, I like to take pictures of unsuspecting subjects since I get to see authentic expressions.

In regards to a media, I think photography is the most faithful. Does it allow the capture of the essence of a subject? Probably. However, through posing or with a painting and other forms of art, I believe that it is possible to highlight some characteristics of your subject. Caricature is really brings out one specific characteristic of the subject. Is it the subject's essence? I think it's then a matter of perception and that the essence of one subject can never be capture in whole regardless of the media. We may capture a representative characteristic, but the essence is more complex.
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:iconsasha-sirozh:
Sasha-Sirozh Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2012
I love street photography, and this is a wonderful article! :D

1. Does the act of posing subjects for photographic composition, to your mind, in any way compromise or lessen the value of the photo as “art”?
I do think that spontaneous photography, like street art, is more difficult to execute and obtain the desired result; after all, these are one of a kind moments. But then again sketches are less time consuming and easier to produce (in general) than oil paintings, and their value as art is the same. So no, of course not - posing doesn't devalue a photograph only because it is the easier of the two to work with.

2. Do you prefer posed or “candid” photographs of your pop heroes? Are paparazzi ever “artists” or is their “art” too assaultive to merit such consideration?
I like both to be honest, but prefer candid. The posed photographs, complete with the crazy outfit and insane makeup, are beautiful, and very expressive. However, the candit photographs, I feel, are always more personal and show you a glimpse at the person. I probably prefer them because I find them easier to relate to- these are the images of the person with relationship problems and who loves icecream (for example), while the people in the posed photos fearlessly perform in front of thousands and record CDs and stuff, something I obviously know nothing about.
No, paparazzi are never artists. The photographs they produce have no meaning and no beauty, other than showing famous people.

Do you think photography best captures the representational “essence” of a person photographed, or is a person’s essence best represented by a sketch artist or great painter? (Or even a poet?)
Photography is very much a thing of a moment, so the essence it captures is gone moments after the shot. I think it is a lot more subtle medium than painting or words, and also it has a lot less room for creativity, so probably makes it inferior to both the pen and the brush (or pencil, tablet.. whatever). I mean, a painter can say a lot about the painting with just the colours, let alone the subject, and a photographer doesn't have as much room for creativity.

The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle tells us that by observing a subject, we change it in that moment, therefore “negating” or “falsifying” any representation we seek to “capture” or “know”. Is art, to your mind, about achieving the closest possible representation of the “truth” about a subject – or is it more about the artist’s desire to capture just for a moment the eternally unknowable?
I'll start by stating that this question is a little over my head. I'm not one for these kinds of philosophical rumifications...
Anyway, I think that art has very little to do with the "truth" about a subject. The truth is singular and immobile, it is a term more at home in the realm of equations and physics than art. The same object represented by two artists will be different, and neither of them will be wrong- both of them will be true- to them. The subjectivity of art doesn't allow for the term.
So by elimination, I think it must be the artist's desire to capture stuff.

Sorry for the rant folks!
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:iconmr-ripley:
Mr-Ripley Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2012  Professional Digital Artist
Great street photography collection. The man with the cat [My Sweet Companion] is my favorite :love:
Reply
:iconwisewanderer:
WiseWanderer Featured By Owner Feb 6, 2012
1. Does the act of posing subjects for photographic composition, to your mind, in any way compromise or lessen the value of the photo as “art”?

No, in no way does it lessen the value. Art is communication. If an artist feels they have to pose a subject to express something, then that is just as valuable and valid as an unposed photo.

2. Do you prefer posed or “candid” photographs of your pop heroes? Are paparazzi ever “artists” or is their “art” too assaultive to merit such consideration?

I prefer candid pop photos, as you feel that something closer to their quintessential and authentic character is being captured. Stage-managed photos are just too controlled, too managed and too unreal when they are deliberately set up to project the desired image.

3. Do you think photography best captures the representational “essence” of a person photographed, or is a person’s essence best represented by a sketch artist or great painter? (Or even a poet?)

I think a drawing can be more representational than a photograph, and so the painter has more scope for portraying how they see the subject, as well as how they think the world sees the subject.

4. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle tells us that by observing a subject, we change it in that moment, therefore “negating” or “falsifying” any representation we seek to “capture” or “know”. Is art, to your mind, about achieving the closest possible representation of the “truth” about a subject – or is it more about the artist’s desire to capture just for a moment the eternally unknowable?

The latter. "Truth" can be expressed in many ways, even such as mathematics, which do not qualify as art. Art for me is much more about trying to capture a truth that cannot be expressed as succinctly in any other way, since it bypasses our rational thoughts and speaks directly to our subconscious.
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:iconrosestocarolyn:
rosestocarolyn Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2012
Fantastic
Reply
:iconangry-mogs:
Angry-MOGS Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Nicely written piece, now on to the questions!

1. Does the act of posing subjects for photographic composition, to your mind, in any way compromise or lessen the value of the photo as “art”? - No, not at all, I think that one should keep in mind that the different types of photos serve different masters when it comes to art. Posed subjects meet certain objectives, unposed meet others. Either way, a little bit of delay or too early of a shot introduce certain changes.

1. Do you prefer posed or “candid” photographs of your pop heroes? Are paparazzi ever “artists” or is their “art” too assaultive to merit such consideration? For the most part, I don't care because I don't really have pop "heroes." I don't use the word "hero" to describe these folks, but, I prefer candid most of the time just because it brings them down to earth and reminds us all that they put on their pants one leg at a time, just like everyone else. In all though, the only time I really bother with "pop" photos is when they happen to catch the more pretty females looking especially good, posed or not. I don't think paparazzi are artists, they are on the absolute border as it is between journalists and crooks.

3. Do you think photography best captures the representational “essence” of a person photographed, or is a person’s essence best represented by a sketch artist or great painter? (Or even a poet?) Actually, I think sculptors best capture the essence of someone, at least in the Classical sense.

4. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle tells us that by observing a subject, we change it in that moment, therefore “negating” or “falsifying” any representation we seek to “capture” or “know”. Is art, to your mind, about achieving the closest possible representation of the “truth” about a subject – or is it more about the artist’s desire to capture just for a moment the eternally unknowable? I think the two have a see-saw relationship, sometimes it's more the former, sometimes the latter.
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:iconcinderdog13:
cinderdog13 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2012
Neat piece!
Reply
:iconleonleonhart:
LeonLeonhart Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
fantastic piece really raises issues as to the nature of photographic art for me , serious food for thought , congrats
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:iconmythomagicfreak:
MythoMagicFreak Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2012
It's amazing how beautiful everday things can look when viewed through a different eye.
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:iconbun800:
Bun800 Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2012
This was a very interesting topic--I'm glad I finally read one of these "hot topics," now I just need to find the others that have been featured but have already left my inbox for not being mainstream anymore.
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:iconalgonquinpaddler:
algonquinpaddler Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2012
I'd love to get into street photography, but I fear sometimes that I am infringing on privacy by just snapping photos of random people whose permission I don't have. However, if I asked permission, they would be aware that I am taking a photo and act differently than they were when I found them and they caught my eye. The special moment would be ruined. Does anyone have tips or advice regarding this?
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:iconmorphoadonis:
MorphoAdonis Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Take the photo first, and have model release forms on hand, and ask each person.

Another idea that is much more time consuming is to tell a group of people you will be photographing their surroundings, and then stay with them for a few hours while they become comfortable again, and then let the scene unfold on its own while you photograph.
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:iconbatmantoo:
batmantoo Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Just shoot and be ready to delete the shot if a person so desires.
And always keep in mind that you are capturing images in a public place with your eyes... a camera is just an extension... don't be too conspicuous though ;)
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